stain

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stain

 [stān]
1. a substance used to impart color to tissues or cells, to facilitate microscopic study and identification.
2. an area of discoloration of the skin.
acid-fast stain a staining procedure for demonstrating acid-fast microorganisms.
differential stain one that facilitates differentiation of various elements in a specimen.
endogenous stain an intrinsic stain acquired during tooth development.
exogenous stain an intrinsic stain acquired after a tooth has erupted.
extrinsic stain a stain that can be removed from a tooth surface by polishing.
Giemsa stain a solution containing azure II-eosin, azure II-glycerin, and methanol; used for staining protozoan parasites such as Plasmodium and Trypanosoma, for Chlamydia, for differential staining of blood smears, and for viral inclusion bodies. Stained elements appear pink to purple to blue.
Gram stain a staining procedure in which bacteria are stained with crystal violet, treated with strong iodine solution, decolorized with ethanol or ethanol-acetone, and counterstained with a contrasting dye; those retaining the stain are called gram-positive, and those losing the stain but staining with the counterstain are called gram-negative.
hematoxylin and eosin stain a mixture of hematoxylin in distilled water and aqueous eosin solution, employed universally for routine examination of tissues.
intrinsic stain a stain that is within the enamel of a tooth and cannot be removed by polishing.
metachromatic stain one that produces in certain elements a color different from that of the stain itself.
nuclear stain one that selectively stains cell nuclei, generally a basic stain.
port-wine stain a persistent dark red to purple nevus flammeus that grows proportionately with the affected child and is usually found on the face. Initially it is macular, but the surface may develop angiomatous overgrowths with time. Port-wine stains often occur in association with other congenital abnormalities.
supravital stain a stain introduced in living tissue or cells that have been removed from the body.
tumor stain an area of increased density in a radiograph, due to collection of contrast material in distorted and abnormal vessels, prominent in the capillary and venous phases of arteriography, and presumed to indicate neoplasm.
vital stain a stain introduced into the living organism, and taken up selectively by various tissue or cellular elements.
Wright's stain a mixture of eosin and methylene blue, used for demonstrating blood cells and malarial parasites.

stain

(stān),
1. To discolor.
2. To color; to dye.
3. A discoloration.
4. A dye used in histologic and bacteriologic techniques
5. A procedure in which a dye or combination of dyes and reagents is used to color the constituents of cells and tissues. For individual dyes or staining substances, see the specific names.
[M.E. steinen]

stain

(stān)
v. stained, staining, stains
v.tr.
To treat (a specimen for the microscope) with a reagent or dye in order to identify cell or tissue structures or microorganisms.
n.
A reagent or dye used for staining microscopic specimens.

stain′a·ble adj.
stain′er n.

stain

(stān)
1. To discolor.
2. To color; to dye.
3. A discoloration.
4. A dye used in histologic and bacteriologic technique.
5. A procedure in which a dye or combination of dyes and reagents is used to color the constituents of cells and tissues.
[M.E. steinen]

stain

(stān)
1. To discolor.
2. To color; to dye.
3. A discoloration.
4. A dye used in histologic and bacteriologic techniques
5. A procedure in which a dye or combination of dyes and reagents is used to color constituents of cells and tissues.
[M.E. steinen]
References in periodicals archive ?
A major reason for increased population of the cotton stainer is its faster egg development (Venugopal et al., 1994) and wide spread growing of transgenic cotton that have reduced insecticides application, whereas, before the introduction of transgenic varieties, cotton stainer was not even a minor pest of cotton in Pakistan (Shah, 2014).
Stainer explained: "We wanted to make our videos episodic so they are something fans will want to wait for and get excited about."
"Stainer told us at the start that he would never allow it and offered us pounds 15,000," said Jim.
Professor Jeremy Dibble, head of Durham's music department, said: "Sir John Stainer's music is a highlight of major events throughout the church year.
She seems keen, much to the bemusement of Kirk's jealous buddies, Stainer and Jack (Vogel), who rate their man as a five maybe six on the eligibility scale and Molly a perfect 10.
She seems keen, much to the bemusement of Kirk's jealous buddies, Stainer and Jack (Mike Vogel), who rate their man as a five, maybe six, on the eligibility scale and Molly a perfect 10.
Meanwhile, Ms Stainer said FIL was delighted with progress on the event.
Slides were stained using a traditional linear stainer (also known as a ''dip and dunk'' stainer) (Leica).
Charles Stainer bought the land for an undisclosed sum in August 1946 from Edward and Willie Pickthorne.
Wearable computers offer hands-free access to pieces of information in two seconds or less--a major improvement m efficiency over laptops arid personal digital assistants, says wearable computer guru Thad Stainer, an assistant professor at Georgia institute of Technology's College of Computing.
Mrs Stainer was responsible for organising the now-expired sponsorship of Pipe's yard by Cathedral City Cheese.