stain

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stain

 [stān]
1. a substance used to impart color to tissues or cells, to facilitate microscopic study and identification.
2. an area of discoloration of the skin.
acid-fast stain a staining procedure for demonstrating acid-fast microorganisms.
differential stain one that facilitates differentiation of various elements in a specimen.
endogenous stain an intrinsic stain acquired during tooth development.
exogenous stain an intrinsic stain acquired after a tooth has erupted.
extrinsic stain a stain that can be removed from a tooth surface by polishing.
Giemsa stain a solution containing azure II-eosin, azure II-glycerin, and methanol; used for staining protozoan parasites such as Plasmodium and Trypanosoma, for Chlamydia, for differential staining of blood smears, and for viral inclusion bodies. Stained elements appear pink to purple to blue.
Gram stain a staining procedure in which bacteria are stained with crystal violet, treated with strong iodine solution, decolorized with ethanol or ethanol-acetone, and counterstained with a contrasting dye; those retaining the stain are called gram-positive, and those losing the stain but staining with the counterstain are called gram-negative.
hematoxylin and eosin stain a mixture of hematoxylin in distilled water and aqueous eosin solution, employed universally for routine examination of tissues.
intrinsic stain a stain that is within the enamel of a tooth and cannot be removed by polishing.
metachromatic stain one that produces in certain elements a color different from that of the stain itself.
nuclear stain one that selectively stains cell nuclei, generally a basic stain.
port-wine stain a persistent dark red to purple nevus flammeus that grows proportionately with the affected child and is usually found on the face. Initially it is macular, but the surface may develop angiomatous overgrowths with time. Port-wine stains often occur in association with other congenital abnormalities.
supravital stain a stain introduced in living tissue or cells that have been removed from the body.
tumor stain an area of increased density in a radiograph, due to collection of contrast material in distorted and abnormal vessels, prominent in the capillary and venous phases of arteriography, and presumed to indicate neoplasm.
vital stain a stain introduced into the living organism, and taken up selectively by various tissue or cellular elements.
Wright's stain a mixture of eosin and methylene blue, used for demonstrating blood cells and malarial parasites.

stain

(stān),
1. To discolor.
2. To color; to dye.
3. A discoloration.
4. A dye used in histologic and bacteriologic techniques
5. A procedure in which a dye or combination of dyes and reagents is used to color the constituents of cells and tissues. For individual dyes or staining substances, see the specific names.
[M.E. steinen]

stain

(stān)
v. stained, staining, stains
v.tr.
To treat (a specimen for the microscope) with a reagent or dye in order to identify cell or tissue structures or microorganisms.
n.
A reagent or dye used for staining microscopic specimens.

stain′a·ble adj.
stain′er n.

stain

(stān)
1. To discolor.
2. To color; to dye.
3. A discoloration.
4. A dye used in histologic and bacteriologic technique.
5. A procedure in which a dye or combination of dyes and reagents is used to color the constituents of cells and tissues.
[M.E. steinen]

stain

(stān)
1. To discolor.
2. To color; to dye.
3. A discoloration.
4. A dye used in histologic and bacteriologic techniques
5. A procedure in which a dye or combination of dyes and reagents is used to color constituents of cells and tissues.
[M.E. steinen]
References in periodicals archive ?
Since Auramine-O stained smears are scanned under lower magnification (20x) than Ziehl-Neelsen stained smears (100x), a greater area is screened per field which makes the process less time-consuming and reduces observer fatigue.
The early diagnosis of active tuberculosis still depends on the presence of AFB in stained sputum smears (11).
In conclusion, the buffalo sperm can be stained with higher concentration of AO stain (1000ug/mL) to detect DNA fragmentation effectively; after washing of egg yolk based extender either with normal or phosphate buffered saline and using heat during the incubation in tampon solution.
The hooklets were better visualized in Leishman stained smears than Pap and HE stained smears.
In the first phase, all 97 lymph node biopsies were stained and positive and negative cases were separated.
Basic structures are stained with acidic stain and the acidic structures are stained with basic stain.
In the smear stained with carbol fuchsin, Cryptosporidium, Cyclospora, and Cystoisospora cysts were visible to 3, 5, and 8 microbiologists, respectively.
The experimental design was completely randomized, comprising ten treatments each with three replicates: red, black and blue ink (Hero, Hamed Warasta Group of Companies, Shanghai, China) stained respectively for 3, 5, and 8 min, and trypan blue (Sigma, USA) for 5 min as the control.
The gels were stained with CBB, PAS and Silver stains according to their respective methods of staining.
If you read a slide prepared and stained by another person, you have far too much faith in your fellow man.
In the middle of the sixteenth century, stained glass was an ecclesiastical art in Europe.After the Islamic conquests, there was a blend between the Islamic and Byzantine arts which led to the development of this handicraft as the mosques and palaces were decorated with stained glass during the Umayyad Age while stained glass was used to decorate the churches in Europe.Craftsman Nidal al-Hashim said that stained glass is made through cutting colored glass into big or small pieces and arranging them according to the required drawing.
Red alder, mahogany, maple, white oak, and pine veneer panels conditioned to 6, 12, or 20 percent moisture content (MC) were stained with red solvent-borne stain, partially coated with clear lacquer, and air dried.