stain

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stain

 [stān]
1. a substance used to impart color to tissues or cells, to facilitate microscopic study and identification.
2. an area of discoloration of the skin.
acid-fast stain a staining procedure for demonstrating acid-fast microorganisms.
differential stain one that facilitates differentiation of various elements in a specimen.
endogenous stain an intrinsic stain acquired during tooth development.
exogenous stain an intrinsic stain acquired after a tooth has erupted.
extrinsic stain a stain that can be removed from a tooth surface by polishing.
Giemsa stain a solution containing azure II-eosin, azure II-glycerin, and methanol; used for staining protozoan parasites such as Plasmodium and Trypanosoma, for Chlamydia, for differential staining of blood smears, and for viral inclusion bodies. Stained elements appear pink to purple to blue.
Gram stain a staining procedure in which bacteria are stained with crystal violet, treated with strong iodine solution, decolorized with ethanol or ethanol-acetone, and counterstained with a contrasting dye; those retaining the stain are called gram-positive, and those losing the stain but staining with the counterstain are called gram-negative.
hematoxylin and eosin stain a mixture of hematoxylin in distilled water and aqueous eosin solution, employed universally for routine examination of tissues.
intrinsic stain a stain that is within the enamel of a tooth and cannot be removed by polishing.
metachromatic stain one that produces in certain elements a color different from that of the stain itself.
nuclear stain one that selectively stains cell nuclei, generally a basic stain.
port-wine stain a persistent dark red to purple nevus flammeus that grows proportionately with the affected child and is usually found on the face. Initially it is macular, but the surface may develop angiomatous overgrowths with time. Port-wine stains often occur in association with other congenital abnormalities.
supravital stain a stain introduced in living tissue or cells that have been removed from the body.
tumor stain an area of increased density in a radiograph, due to collection of contrast material in distorted and abnormal vessels, prominent in the capillary and venous phases of arteriography, and presumed to indicate neoplasm.
vital stain a stain introduced into the living organism, and taken up selectively by various tissue or cellular elements.
Wright's stain a mixture of eosin and methylene blue, used for demonstrating blood cells and malarial parasites.

stain

(stān),
1. To discolor.
2. To color; to dye.
3. A discoloration.
4. A dye used in histologic and bacteriologic techniques
5. A procedure in which a dye or combination of dyes and reagents is used to color the constituents of cells and tissues. For individual dyes or staining substances, see the specific names.
[M.E. steinen]

stain

(stān)
v. stained, staining, stains
v.tr.
To treat (a specimen for the microscope) with a reagent or dye in order to identify cell or tissue structures or microorganisms.
n.
A reagent or dye used for staining microscopic specimens.

stain′a·ble adj.
stain′er n.

stain

(stān)
1. To discolor.
2. To color; to dye.
3. A discoloration.
4. A dye used in histologic and bacteriologic technique.
5. A procedure in which a dye or combination of dyes and reagents is used to color the constituents of cells and tissues.
[M.E. steinen]

stain

(stān)
1. To discolor.
2. To color; to dye.
3. A discoloration.
4. A dye used in histologic and bacteriologic techniques
5. A procedure in which a dye or combination of dyes and reagents is used to color constituents of cells and tissues.
[M.E. steinen]
References in periodicals archive ?
Liver iron concentration, stainable iron, and total body storage iron.
Percentage stainable pollen in the amphiploid breeding population ranged from 56 to 99% and averaged 85 [+ or -] 0.1% stainable pollen.
Stainable iron scores were generally low in the patients in this study, however, it was more commonly seen in genotype 3.
We investigated the pharmacokinetic disposition and bioavailability of deferiprone in the white leghorn chicken, a species that can be intravenously iron loaded, has no stainable iron in the liver of healthy birds, (32) and is large enough for the multiple blood collections required for a pharmacokinetic study.
These sandable fillers are often labeled "stainable," but they usually absorb more or less than the surrounding wood, leaving light or dark dots at each nail hole.
Laboratory abnormalities encountered in HH include increased levels of alanine and aspartate aminotransaminases, or AST/ALT, elevated serum iron transferrin saturation (>60%), increased serum ferritin, and higher amounts of hepatic parenchymal cell stainable iron.
The IDA group consisted of 32 anemic patients who had no stainable iron in the bone marrow.
Featuring a high-definition panel profile that reflects real wood door design and beauty, all Belleville Fiberglass Doors are offered with a stainable variable-etch wood-grain texture or paintable smooth surface and can be enhanced with a wide range of decorative glass options.
A number of markers like serum ferritin, serum iron, total iron binding capacity, and transferrin saturation are used to assess the iron status of the individual, (3) but microscopic examination of the stainable iron in the bone marrow is considered the gold standard for determining the body iron stores.
Macroregenerative nodules in cirrhosis are not associated with elevated serum or stainable tissue alpha fetoprotein.