stain

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stain

 [stān]
1. a substance used to impart color to tissues or cells, to facilitate microscopic study and identification.
2. an area of discoloration of the skin.
acid-fast stain a staining procedure for demonstrating acid-fast microorganisms.
differential stain one that facilitates differentiation of various elements in a specimen.
endogenous stain an intrinsic stain acquired during tooth development.
exogenous stain an intrinsic stain acquired after a tooth has erupted.
extrinsic stain a stain that can be removed from a tooth surface by polishing.
Giemsa stain a solution containing azure II-eosin, azure II-glycerin, and methanol; used for staining protozoan parasites such as Plasmodium and Trypanosoma, for Chlamydia, for differential staining of blood smears, and for viral inclusion bodies. Stained elements appear pink to purple to blue.
Gram stain a staining procedure in which bacteria are stained with crystal violet, treated with strong iodine solution, decolorized with ethanol or ethanol-acetone, and counterstained with a contrasting dye; those retaining the stain are called gram-positive, and those losing the stain but staining with the counterstain are called gram-negative.
hematoxylin and eosin stain a mixture of hematoxylin in distilled water and aqueous eosin solution, employed universally for routine examination of tissues.
intrinsic stain a stain that is within the enamel of a tooth and cannot be removed by polishing.
metachromatic stain one that produces in certain elements a color different from that of the stain itself.
nuclear stain one that selectively stains cell nuclei, generally a basic stain.
port-wine stain a persistent dark red to purple nevus flammeus that grows proportionately with the affected child and is usually found on the face. Initially it is macular, but the surface may develop angiomatous overgrowths with time. Port-wine stains often occur in association with other congenital abnormalities.
supravital stain a stain introduced in living tissue or cells that have been removed from the body.
tumor stain an area of increased density in a radiograph, due to collection of contrast material in distorted and abnormal vessels, prominent in the capillary and venous phases of arteriography, and presumed to indicate neoplasm.
vital stain a stain introduced into the living organism, and taken up selectively by various tissue or cellular elements.
Wright's stain a mixture of eosin and methylene blue, used for demonstrating blood cells and malarial parasites.

stain

(stān),
1. To discolor.
2. To color; to dye.
3. A discoloration.
4. A dye used in histologic and bacteriologic techniques
5. A procedure in which a dye or combination of dyes and reagents is used to color the constituents of cells and tissues. For individual dyes or staining substances, see the specific names.
[M.E. steinen]

stain

(stān)
v. stained, staining, stains
v.tr.
To treat (a specimen for the microscope) with a reagent or dye in order to identify cell or tissue structures or microorganisms.
n.
A reagent or dye used for staining microscopic specimens.

stain′a·ble adj.
stain′er n.

stain

(stān)
1. To discolor.
2. To color; to dye.
3. A discoloration.
4. A dye used in histologic and bacteriologic technique.
5. A procedure in which a dye or combination of dyes and reagents is used to color the constituents of cells and tissues.
[M.E. steinen]

stain

(stān)
1. To discolor.
2. To color; to dye.
3. A discoloration.
4. A dye used in histologic and bacteriologic techniques
5. A procedure in which a dye or combination of dyes and reagents is used to color constituents of cells and tissues.
[M.E. steinen]
References in periodicals archive ?
However, there appears to be enough variation for pollen stainability and seed set to indicate that selection for increased fertility is possible.
Pollen stainability in Hycrest/6x-BL//Hycrest/6x-BL hybrids ranged from 22 to 90% (43 plants) with an average of 62%.
We assayed pollen stainability for each individual by averaging two replicate samples of 100 randomly selected pollen grains on hemacytometer grids under a compound microscope.
Pollen/ovule ratios and pollen stainability. - Ten unopened flower buds of each variety at DN and 10 buds of C.
Effect of liquid polishing materials on the stainability of bis-acryl interim restorative materials in vitro.
Shilpa, "Effects of different children health drinks on stainability of anteriortooth colored restorative materials-an in vitro study," Journal of Pediatric Dentistry, vol.
The CWES cultivars Glenlea and Wildcat have laxer, fusiform spikes and lower pollen stainability relative to other spring wheat cultivars (Hucl, 1996).
Thus, sperm chromatin damage can be quantified by the FCM measurements of the metachromatic shift from green (native, double-stranded DNA) to red (denatured, single-stranded DNA) fluorescence and displayed as red (fragmented DNA) versus green (DNA stainability) fluorescence intensity cytogram patterns.
Of the five characters studied on mature plants in each population (date of first flowering, final number of flowers on the first inflorescence, number of secondary branches, ovule numbers per flower and pollen stainability), selfed progeny performed worse than outcrossed progeny for plant height at 10 wk, date of first flowering, number of flowers on the first inflorescence, and number of secondary branches in populations D, H, and M, and number of secondary branches, number of ovules, and pollen stainability in population T (Table 4).
Verl was selected for its female fertility (seed set), male fertility (pollen stainability), and forage production attributes from 243 [F.sub.1] progeny resulting from the cross GSF-1 (PI 483447)/WW-1724.
After seven generations, where seed was harvested and grown-out, pollen stainability increased to 87 and 85% in the [F.sub.7] and [F.sub.8] generations, respectively.
sturtianum B[C.sub.1] pentaploid, whose pollen grain stainability and germination rates were only 6 and 1%, respectively.