staff of Aesculapius


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Related to staff of Aesculapius: Asklepian

staff

 [staf]
1. a wooden rod or rodlike structure.
2. a grooved director used as a guide for the knife in lithotomy.
3. the professional personnel of a health care facility or agency.
staff of Aesculapius see aesculapius.
attending staff the corps of attending physicians and surgeons of a hospital.
consulting staff specialists associated with a hospital and acting in an advisory capacity to the attending staff.
house staff the resident physicians and surgeons of a hospital.
staff mix a term in the nursing minimum data set, defined as the combination of all caregivers participating in nursing care for an individual patient or client.

staff of Aes·cu·la·pi·us

(staf es'kū-lā'pē-ŭs),
A rod encircled by a serpent; symbol of medicine and emblem of the American Medical Association, Royal Army Medical Corps (Britain), and Royal Canadian Medical Corps.
See also: caduceus.
[L. Aesculapius, G. Asklēpios, god of medicine]

staff of Ӕsculapius

a staff carried by Ӕsculapius, the Greek god of medicine. It is used as the traditional symbol of the physician. A single serpent entwines the staff of Ӕsculapius. It is often confused with the caduceus, a staff with two serpents (which is the staff of Hermes, the Greek god of commerce and travel), symbolizing (because of this misunderstanding) the U.S. Army Medical Corps. See also Ӕsculapius.
The ‘correct’ symbol of medicine, which is a knarled wooden staff with a single encircling snake held in the accompanying image by Asclepius who stands frowning centre-stage. A widely used—and incorrect—alternative symbol for medicine is the Caduceus a magic wand with two snakes, held by the Roman god Mercury, also known as Hermes in Greek mythology, to the far left in the image

staff of Aes·cu·la·pi·us

(staf es-kyū-lā'pē-ǔs)
A rod with a single serpent without wings encircling it; symbol of medicine and emblem of the American Medical Association, Royal Army Medical Corps (Britain), and Royal Canadian Medical Corps.
See also: caduceus
[L. Aesculapius, G. Asklēpios, god of medicine]