stadiometer


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sta·di·om·e·ter

(stā'dē-om'ĕ-tĕr),
An instrument to measure height both standing and sitting.
[L. stadium, fr. G. stadion, a fixed length, + G. metron, measure]

stadiometer

(stā″dē-ŏm′ă-tĕr) [Gr. stadium + ″]
A device used to measure body height, esp. of children.
References in periodicals archive ?
For determination of BMI, calibrated electronic/digital scales and a stadiometer were used (n = 12) [10, 31, 33, 35, 36,43, 44, 51-53, 56, 57] or had participants self-report their height and weight (n = 1) [54].
While weight was measured without heavy clothing and recorded to the nearest 100 g, height was measured without shoes and recorded to the nearest mm with a stadiometer. Waist circumference and hip circumference were measured to the nearest 1 mm using a stadiometer and a metal anthropometric tape, respectively.
Anthropometric measurements including length/height (length by recumbent stadiometer for subjects younger than 2 years old, height by Harpenden stadiometer) and weight (by electronic scale) were obtained (12) in all subjects.
Height was measured in centimeter (cm) using a stadiometer. BMI was calculated as weight (kg) divided by height square (m2) categorized the patients according to the criteria by the WHO, normal weight, BMI <24.9 kg/m2; overweight, 25<BMI30 kg/m2.
Height was measured using a stadiometer by having the subject standing straight without shoes and weight was measured by national seca personal dial type weighing machine.
Height and weight were measured with a stadiometer, and BMI was calculated as weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters.
We used a digital stadiometer (Seca 274) for measurement of height and weight of the students.
Stature (height) was measured by using a stadiometer (Holtain Ltd., Crymych Dyfed, UK).
Weighing scale and stadiometer were calibrated and validated by Department of Biometrics prior to the study.
The SH was obtained adapting a removable box (60 cm) to the stadiometer, where the child was sat with the trunk erect and the head in the Frankfurt plane.
Each fieldworker was equipped with a portable electronic scale and a standard weight for calibration purposes (Precision Health Scale, model UC-321, A&D Company, Japan; maximum capacity 150 kg) as well as a stadiometer for carrying out the measurements.