stadiometer


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sta·di·om·e·ter

(stā'dē-om'ĕ-tĕr),
An instrument to measure height both standing and sitting.
[L. stadium, fr. G. stadion, a fixed length, + G. metron, measure]

stadiometer

(stā″dē-ŏm′ă-tĕr) [Gr. stadium + ″]
A device used to measure body height, esp. of children.
References in periodicals archive ?
Height was recorded without shoes, using a wall stadiometer to the nearest 1 mm.
The heights of a total of 5 716 students were measured as naked and standing with the heels combined and the head, feet, back and hip touching the wall leaning to the wall using the Harpendin Stadiometer from the top of the head to the sole as meters.
Measures of weight (kilograms) and height (meters) were assessed using a standard physician's scale and a stadiometer respectively.
At the baseline visit, body weight was measured with a calibrated balance beam scale, height was measured with a calibrated, wall-mounted stadiometer, and waist circumference was measured at the end of normal expiration over nonbinding undergarments in a horizontal plane at the natural waist.
Height (cm) and weight (kg) were obtained by measuring to the tenth digit using the SECA Road Rod stadiometer (78 "/200cm) and the SECA 840 Personal Digital Scale.
1 cm using a stadiometer, which consisted of a Cardiomed[R] tape measure fixed to the wall in a straight line towards the floor.
Height was measured twice at the same time during the day and neared to the next millimeter using the Harpenden Stadiometer (Holtain, Ltd, Crymmych, Wales, U.
Height was determined through the use of a wall-mounted stadiometer after shoes were removed.
Body height was measured using a stadiometer to the nearest 0.
Body mass was measured using a Seca 750 scale and height was measured with a portable stadiometer.
Children (N = 193, 51% girls) were objectively assessed for height and weight via stadiometer and digital scale, and the data were converted to body mass index (BMI) percentile via Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, 2010a) growth charts.
Height was measured with a wall mounted stadiometer (SECA) and rounded to the nearest 0.