square root sign

square root sign

Cardiology A pressure contour recorded by cardiac catheterization, which consists of an elevation of the right ventricular diastolic pressure with early filling and a subsequent plateau, a finding suggestive of chronic constrictive pericarditis
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Cardiac catheterization revealed the presence of the square root sign with equalization of right and left ventricular end-diastolic pressures, together with modest elevation in right ventricular systolic pressure (40 mmHg) and absence of respiratory variations.
It is the value of the discriminant, the term under the square root sign, [b.sup.2] - 4ac, that determines whether the quadratic equation has real or complex solutions.
Cardiac catheterisation showed end diastolic equalisation of pressures in all 4 chambers, more than 25% respiratory variations in the mitral inflow pattern [Figure-2A], early diastolic dip and plateau pattern (Square root sign) [Figure 2B] and normal pulmonary artery systolic pressures.
According to IoD forecasters the recovery cycle appears to be taking the shape of a square root sign, with 2010's growth spurt now set to level off.
The Sqrt is intended to be replaced with the square root sign. As currently published, if the published best speed was 81 kt, and the weight was equal to full gross, the chosen approach speed would be nine knots!
When k = 4 the expression under the square root sign is a perfect square, and then x = 4 [+ or -] 2 = 6 or 2.
"The recovery will look like an inverted square root sign. You hit bottom and you automatically rebound some, but you don't come out of it in a V-shaped recovery or anything like that" George Soros, billionaire financier, explains the economic crisis "I'll never retire.
Although it might not at first look like one, the expression under the outer square root sign should be a square--otherwise the solutions found experimentally would be hard to explain.
The obvious line of attack is to use a substitution to tidy up the mess within the square root sign. Hopefully some unexpected side effect of this will deal with the troublesome sin [phi] factor and allow the integral to be evaluated before I run out of different letters to use as pronumerals.