squamation


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squamation

(skwə-mā′shən)
n.
1. The condition of being scaly.
2. An arrangement of scales, as on a fish.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The matrix block presents a natural external mould of the ventral side of the skull including mandibles, submandibular plates, lateral and median gulars, part of the shoulder girdle, a fragment of the pectoral fin and squamation of the anterior part of the body.
Fins, vertebrae, and squamation. Fins are mostly missing, although the pectoral girdle is preserved, and there is also some indication of the position of the dorsal fin.
Frontal squamation F and G patterned; scales arranged in transverse pattern, all scales with exposed posterior margin.
These proliferative lesions likely originated from bronchiolar epithelial cells and did not involve squamation. Unlike typical hyperplastic changes seen in epithelial cells after asbestos-induced lung fibrosis (Robledo et al.
A combination of morphological characters, pigmentation, preopercular spine pattern, meristic counts, and squamation in later developmental stages is essential to identify Icelinus to the species level.
beniensis, from the rio Madeira drainage; Owiyeye is diagnosed by the absence of dermosphenotic, a derived pattern of frontal squamation, and a colour pattern of the mandibular region, and includes species from the Amazonas and Orinoco river basins; Melanorivulus is diagnosed by an apomorphic morphology of preopercle, and derived colour patterns of male postorbital region and female unpaired fins, and includes species from southern Amazonian tributaries, Parana-Paraguay river system, and Parnaiba and Sao Francisco river basins.
Although he could find no differences in color pattern or squamation between it and the adjacent peninsular populations of C.
Sexual dimorphism is determined in, at least, eight characteristics of size and squamation. Specimens were found in epiphytic bromeliads and the ground.
Enlarged post-occipital squamation is relatively rare in the estuarine crocodile.
Banister (1984) examined characteristics of a hypogean population of the cyprinid, Garra barreimiae Fowler and Steinitz, and found the hypogean fishes to differ only in that they were depigmented, lacked externally visible eyes and had weak squamation. Smaller specimens (11-14 mm SL) had externally visible eyes, while larger ([greater than] 24 mm SL) had tissue covering the eye.