squamate


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Related to squamate: order Squamata

squamate

(skwā′māt′, skwä′-)
n.
Any of various reptiles of the order Squamata, which includes the lizards, snakes, and worm lizards.
adj.
1. Of or relating to reptiles of the order Squamata.
2. Of or relating to squamae.

squa·mous

(skwā'mŭs)
Relating to or covered with scales.
Synonym(s): scaly, squamate.
[L. squamosus]
References in periodicals archive ?
District Dir lower, primarily sub-tropical, was found more diverse regarding squamate species than district Upper Dir which is dominantly temperate with prolonged winters and lower temperature.
These data are important for fossil identification because the maxilla is a common bone in the squamate fossil record and taxonomically significant characters are still unknown for several groups.
Studies of squamate biology, however, have been hampered by controversy over their evolutionary relationships, and some researchers consider their family tree to be unresolved.
Scanning electron microscopy of changes in epidermal structure occurring during the shedding cycle in squamate reptiles.
Therefore, the diversity of the Upper Cretaceous Iberian squamate fauna is clearly higher than recognized presently.
The evolution of viviparity: molecular and genomic data from squamate reptiles advance understanding of live birth in amniotes.
Cutaneous mycobiota of captive squamate reptiles with notes on the scarcity of Chrysosporium anamorph Nannizziopsis vriesii.
In this last exercise, the "descent with modification" schema is transferred from squamate reptiles to all organisms.
All hairs serrate, cuticle squamate. Tibiae with two rows of trichobothria (Fig.
Therefore, thermoregulation might be the most important factor in determining squamate habitat use patterns (Grant 1990, Peterson et al.
More generally, much of the interspecific variation in thermoregulatory tactics among squamate reptiles may reflect differences in species-specific costs and benefits of thermoregulation rather than variation among habitats.