Sputum

(redirected from sputa)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to sputa: sputum specimen

sputum

 [spu´tum]
mucous secretion from the lungs, bronchi, and trachea that is ejected through the mouth, in contrast to saliva, which is the secretion of the salivary glands. Called also expectoration.
induced sputum a sputum specimen produced for diagnostic tests by aerosol administration of a hypertonic saline solution.
sputum specimen a sample of mucous secretion from the bronchi and lungs. The specimen may be examined microscopically for the presence of malignant cells (cytologic examination) or tested to identify pathogenic bacteria (bacteriologic examination). It is essential that the specimen obtained be mucus from the lungs and bronchi and not saliva. For those unable to produce sputum for examination, an aerosol may be used to increase the flow of secretions and stimulate coughing. The optimum time for collection of a sputum specimen is in the morning before eating or drinking anything. At this time secretions accumulated in the bronchi through the night are more readily available, and, should the coughing produce gagging, the patient is less likely to vomit if the stomach is empty. Specimens collected for bacteriologic culture must be placed in a sterile container and handled with care to avoid contamination from sources other than the sputum.

spu·tum

, pl.

spu·ta

(spyū'tŭm, -tă), Although the sense of the Latin word includes spittle or saliva, in medical usage sputum refers to secretions expelled from the lower respiratory tract.
1. Expectorated matter, especially mucus or mucopurulent matter expectorated in diseases of the air passages.
See also: expectoration (1).
2. An individual mass of such matter.
[L. sputum, fr. spuo, pp. sputus, to spit]

sputum

(spyo͞o′təm)
n. pl. spu·ta (-tə)
Matter coughed up and usually ejected from the mouth, including saliva, foreign material, and substances such as mucus or phlegm, from the respiratory tract.

sputum

Semiliquid diagnostic 'goo' obtained from deep coughs from the lungs, bronchi, trachea, which is collected sterilely and examined by cytology and/or cultured Complications Laceration of coronary arteries, or liver due to puncture, arrhythmias caused by needle irritation, vasovagal arrest, pneumothorax, infection. See Brick-red sputum, Currant jelly sputum, Induced sputum, Prune juice sputum, Rusty sputum.
Sputum–diagnostic utility
Cytologic examination Specimen is smeared on a glass slide, stained with one of several dyes, and examined by LM; the only cells seen in normal sputa are those of tracheobronchial tree and lungs.
Culture & sensitivity The specimen is swabbed on a culture plate in the microbiology laboratory to detect the growth of potentially harmful bacteria or fungi

spu·tum

(spyū'tŭm)
1. Expectorated matter, especially mucus or mucopurulent matter expectorated in diseases of the air passages.
See also: expectoration (1)
2. An individual mass of such matter.
[L. sputum, fr. spuo, pp. sputus, to spit]

sputum

Mucus, often mixed with PUS or blood, that is secreted by the goblet cells in the MUCOUS MEMBRANE lining of the respiratory tubes (BRONCHI and BRONCHIOLES). Excess sputum prompts the cough reflex. Also known as phlegm.

sputum

material coughed up from the respiratory tract, whose colour, volume, smell and consistency are important in the diagnosis and management of respiratory disorders.

Sputum

The substance that is brought up from the lungs and airway when a person coughs or spits. It is usually a mixture of saliva and mucus, but may contain blood or pus in patients with lung abscess or other diseases of the lungs.

spu·tum

(spyū'tŭm)
1. Expectorated matter, especially mucus or mucopurulent matter expectorated in diseases of the air passages.
2. An individual mass of such matter.
[L. sputum, fr. spuo, pp. sputus, to spit]
References in periodicals archive ?
All 38 patients with NTM in their sputa had received anti-TB therapy (ATT) as per national RNTCP (India) guidelines, (3) based on the presence of AFB in their sputa.
The authors suggested that the presence of NTM in sputa may lead to misdiagnosis of MDR and, potentially, inappropriate treatment of the presumed MDR cases, while emphasizing the need to consider NTM when dealing with putative TB treatment failure.
However, the results in smear-negative sputa were also acceptable.
For example, PCP, has been used to detect mutant DNAs in neoplastic exfoliated cells; mutations have been detected in ras genes present in stool samples obtained from patients with colorectal cancel, and in p53 from the urine of patients with bladder cancer and in the sputa of patients with lung cancer.
Therefore, assays should be tailored to detect a small number of abnormal cells or molecules among a large number of normal cells or molecules in biological fluids, such as in colonic washes of the gastrointestinal tract, in sputa, and in bronchial biopsies.