spur

(redirected from spurs)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

spur

 [sper]
1. a spiked object or goad.
2. a projecting body, as from a bone; called also calcar.
Calcaneal (heel) spur. From Frazier et al., 2000.

cal·car

(kal'kar), [TA]
1. A small projection from any structure; internal spurs (septa) at the level of division of arteries and confluence of veins when branches or roots form an acute angle.
See also: vascular spur.
2. A dull spine or projection from a bone.
Synonym(s): spur [TA]
[L. spur, cock's spur]

spur

(spur)
1. calcar; a spiked projecting body, as from a bone.
2. in dentistry, a piece of metal projecting from a plate, band, or other appliance.

calcaneal spur  a bone excrescence on the lower surface of the calcaneus which frequently causes pain on walking.
scleral spur  the posterior lip of the venous sinus of the sclera to which most of the fibers of the trabecular reticulum of the iridocorneal angle and the meridional fibers of the ciliary muscle are attached.

spur

(spûr)
n.
A spine or projection from a bone.

spur

Etymology: AS, spura
a projection of bone from a body structure or of metal from an appliance. See also exostosis.

spur

Orthopedics A bony projection often arising in a calcified tendon. See Calcaneal spur.

cal·car

(kal'kahr) [TA]
1. A small projection from any structure; internal spurs (septa) at the level of division of arteries and confluence of veins when branches or roots form an acute angle.
2. A spine or projection from a bone.
Synonym(s): spur.
[L. spur, rooster's spur]

spur

  1. a short shoot on which flowers are borne.
  2. an extension of a leafbase below its point of attachment to the petiole.
  3. a hollow, conical projection from the base of a petal, as in the larkspur.

Spur

Any projection from a bone.
Mentioned in: Rotator Cuff Injury

spur

1. an abnormal projecting body, as from a bone.
2. a piece of riding gear worn on the heel of a horserider's boot and used to urge on a horse to a faster speed by digging the spur into the flank.
3. a sharp, horn-covered, bony projection from the shank of male birds of some species. Used as a weapon. Called also metatarsal spur.
4. tracheal spur, the ridge of tracheal cartilage that separates the beginning of the right bronchus from the beginnings of the left one.

spur veins
subcutaneous veins visible over the ventral part of the chest of a horse (superficial thoracic vein). Subject to laceration by indiscriminate use of sharp spurs by the vigorous rider.
References in periodicals archive ?
Marc Stein, ESPN: Celtics, Cavaliers, Raptors, Wizards, Warriors, Spurs, Rockets, Clippers
5]; dorsal lobe thin, thinner than apical spurs; thin spur on opposing side of 1st gonapophysis can sometimes be seen projecting above dorsal surface of 1st gonapophysis (not shown in Fig.
Hills: 4-9 M Jol to leave Spurs before end of this season.
Pierce tied it again, then Duncan matched him for a Spurs lead.
However, this assumption is too simple and cannot be used as a basis for predicting code spurs.
The concept of spur apertures (windows) just described can be extended to include spurs within a range of LO frequencies.
On October 10 , 1953 played for Spurs against Arsenal alongside.
In Europe, a purple-blue version with a particularly stylish spur lures buumblebees.
The Spurs took Game 1 (122-105) and Game 2 (112-77) rather convincingly but the Thunder showed a sense of urgency on both ends of the floor on Sunday winning the battle of the boards-56-to-32 rebounding advantage for OKC-and holding the Spurs to just 39.