spur


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Related to spur: Heel spur, Bone spur

spur

 [sper]
1. a spiked object or goad.
2. a projecting body, as from a bone; called also calcar.
Calcaneal (heel) spur. From Frazier et al., 2000.

cal·car

(kal'kar), [TA]
1. A small projection from any structure; internal spurs (septa) at the level of division of arteries and confluence of veins when branches or roots form an acute angle.
See also: vascular spur.
2. A dull spine or projection from a bone.
Synonym(s): spur [TA]
[L. spur, cock's spur]

spur

(spur)
1. calcar; a spiked projecting body, as from a bone.
2. in dentistry, a piece of metal projecting from a plate, band, or other appliance.

calcaneal spur  a bone excrescence on the lower surface of the calcaneus which frequently causes pain on walking.
scleral spur  the posterior lip of the venous sinus of the sclera to which most of the fibers of the trabecular reticulum of the iridocorneal angle and the meridional fibers of the ciliary muscle are attached.

spur

(spûr)
n.
A spine or projection from a bone.

spur

Etymology: AS, spura
a projection of bone from a body structure or of metal from an appliance. See also exostosis.

spur

Orthopedics A bony projection often arising in a calcified tendon. See Calcaneal spur.

cal·car

(kal'kahr) [TA]
1. A small projection from any structure; internal spurs (septa) at the level of division of arteries and confluence of veins when branches or roots form an acute angle.
2. A spine or projection from a bone.
Synonym(s): spur.
[L. spur, rooster's spur]

spur

  1. a short shoot on which flowers are borne.
  2. an extension of a leafbase below its point of attachment to the petiole.
  3. a hollow, conical projection from the base of a petal, as in the larkspur.

Spur

Any projection from a bone.
Mentioned in: Rotator Cuff Injury

spur

1. an abnormal projecting body, as from a bone.
2. a piece of riding gear worn on the heel of a horserider's boot and used to urge on a horse to a faster speed by digging the spur into the flank.
3. a sharp, horn-covered, bony projection from the shank of male birds of some species. Used as a weapon. Called also metatarsal spur.
4. tracheal spur, the ridge of tracheal cartilage that separates the beginning of the right bronchus from the beginnings of the left one.

spur veins
subcutaneous veins visible over the ventral part of the chest of a horse (superficial thoracic vein). Subject to laceration by indiscriminate use of sharp spurs by the vigorous rider.
References in classic literature ?
The foundation of their airy castles lay already before them in the strip of rich alluvium on the river bank, where the North Fork, sharply curving round the base of Devil's Spur, had for centuries swept the detritus of gulch and canyon.
Down went Rocinante, and over went his master, rolling along the ground for some distance; and when he tried to rise he was unable, so encumbered was he with lance, buckler, spurs, helmet, and the weight of his old armour; and all the while he was struggling to get up he kept saying, "Fly not, cowards and caitiffs
One cachalot killed, it ran at the next, tacked on the spot that it might not miss its prey, going forwards and backwards, answering to its helm, plunging when the cetacean dived into the deep waters, coming up with it when it returned to the surface, striking it front or sideways, cutting or tearing in all directions and at any pace, piercing it with its terrible spur.
D'Artagnan and Planchet did not require twice bidding; they unfastened the two horses that were waiting at the door, leaped upon them, buried their spurs in their sides, and set off at full gallop.
D'Artagnan, freely applying his spurs, was in advance of Porthos two feet at the most; Musqueton followed two lengths behind; the guards were scattered according to the varying excellence of their respective mounts.
with all its dips, spurs, angles, variations and sinuosities, and
I guess the way to fix you is to keep the spur just a-touching--ah
He shook his bridle as he spoke, and thundered away, his knights lying low upon their horses and galloping as hard as whip and spur would drive them, in the hope of winning the king's prize.
Indeed this caution of the boy was needless; for Jones, notwithstanding his hurry and impatience, would have ordered this of himself; for he by no means agreed with the opinion of those who consider animals as mere machines, and when they bury their spurs in the belly of their horse, imagine the spur and the horse to have an equal capacity of feeling pain.
The time went on, and the sun was very hot; the flies swarmed round me and settled on my bleeding flanks where the spurs had dug in.
The man lay flat upon his pony's back hugging the animal's neck tightly with both arms and digging the spurs into his sides.
Kiouni, resuming his rapid gait, soon descended the lower spurs of the Vindhias, and towards noon they passed by the village of Kallenger, on the Cani, one of the branches of the Ganges.