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species

 [spe´shēz]
a taxonomic category subordinate to a genus (or subgenus) and superior to a subspecies or variety; composed of individuals similar in certain morphologic and physiologic characteristics.
type species the original species from which the description of the genus is formulated.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

spe·cies

, pl.

spe·cies

(spē'shēz), Avoid the mispronunciation spē'sēz. The singular and plural forms of this word are both species. Specie is not the singular of species. A species name begins with a lowercase letter and is printed in italic type: [Branhamella] catarrhalis, [Pneumocystis] jiroveci. When a species is unknown or not identified, the abbreviation sp., in roman type, is used: Rhizpus sp. (one unidentified species of Rhizopus), Bacteroides spp. (more than one unidentified species). Avoid slang abridgments of species names such as "H. flu" (Haemophilus influenzae).
1. A biologic division between the genus and a variety or the individual; a group of organisms that generally bear a close resemblance to one another in the more essential features of their organization, and breed effectively producing fertile progeny.
2. A class of pharmaceutical preparations consisting of a mixture of dried plants, not pulverized, but in sufficiently fine division to be conveniently used in the making of extemporaneous decoctions or infusions, as a tea.
[L. appearance, form, kind, fr. specio, to look at]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

species

(spē′shēz, -sēz)
n. pl. species
1. Biology A group of closely related organisms that are very similar to each other and are usually capable of interbreeding and producing fertile offspring. The species is the fundamental category of taxonomic classification, ranking below a genus or subgenus. Species names are represented in binomial nomenclature by an uncapitalized Latin adjective or noun following a capitalized genus name, as in Ananas comosus, the pineapple, and Equus caballus, the horse.
2. Chemistry A set of atoms, molecules, ions, or other chemical entities that possess the same distinct characteristics with respect to a chemical process or measurement.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

spe·cies

, pl. species (spē'shēz)
1. A biologic division between the genus and a variety or the individual; a group of organisms that generally bear a close resemblance to one another in the more essential features of their organization, and that breed effectively, producing fertile progeny.
2. A class of pharmaceutical preparations consisting of a mixture of dried plants, not pulverized, but in sufficiently fine division to be conveniently used in the making of extemporaneous decoctions or infusions, as a tea.
[L. appearance, form, kind, fr. specio, to look at]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

species

the lowest (taxonomic) grouping of animals or plants which, at least potentially, forms an interbreeding array of populations unable to breed freely with other sorts of animal or plant. Thus members of a species have breeding compatibility and produce fertile offspring. The species is the only natural unit (taxon) of CLASSIFICATION. It is usually recognized on the basis of morphological characters (a MORPHOSPECIES), but different species can be morphologically identical (sibling species), for example, Drosophila pseudoobscura and D. persimilis exhibit behavioural differences leading to REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION. see BINOMIAL NOMENCLATURE. For asexually reproducing organisms, such as bacteria, a precise definition of species has not been universally formulated and agreed. Generally individuals displaying a high degree of similarity based on biochemical, genetic and morphological characteristics, for example, are grouped as species.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Examples are plants of the buckwheat family such as dock (Rumex spp.), and garden rhubarb (Rheum officinale).
Examples are red root pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexis) and lamb's quarters (Chenopodium spp.).
Buffaloberry (Shepherdia spp.) Berries are edible but have a soapy taste.
Cattail (Typha spp.) The base of young shoots, roots, immature seed bearing structure and pollen.
Mourning cloak Willows (Salix spp.) (Nymphalis antiopa)
Western tiger swallowtail Wild plums and cherries (Prunus spp) (Papilio rutulus) Willows (Salix spp.)
Aspens and poplars (Populus spp.) Two-tailed swallowtail Wild plums (Prunus spp.) (Papilio multicaudatus) Ashes (Fraxinus spp.)
Daylily (Hemerocallis spp.) The entire plant is edible.
Of the 370 biting flies collected, 104 (62%) of the horn flies (Haematobia spp.), 60 (33%) of the stable flies (Stomoxys spp.), 11 (92%) of the deer flies (Chrysops spp.), and 10 (91%) of the horse flies (Tabanus spp.) were tested for Bartonella DNA.
The sequence obtained from the horn fly pool (Haematobia spp.) collected in the beef cattle barn was identical to that for B.
In naturally or experimentally infected animals, a spectrum of clinical illness will develop; for example, of the nonhuman species that naturally acquire monkeypox virus infections, skin lesions have only been observed in some African primate species and rope squirrels (Funiscuirus spp.) (5,20).
Since first described in Africa in 1910, tick-transmitted rickettsioses have been imputed to a single rickettsial species, Rickettsia conorii, although two distinct clinical illnesses have been observed (6): an urban form in patients in contact with dogs and their ticks (Rhipicephalus spp.) characterized by fever, headache, myalgia, cutaneous rash, and a lesion at the site of the tick bite (7), and a rural form in patients in contact with cattle or game and their ticks (Amblyomma spp.) characterized by mild signs and frequent lack of rash (8).