sports medicine


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medicine

 [med´ĭ-sin]
1. any drug or remedy.
2. the art and science of the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.
3. the nonsurgical treatment of disease.
alternative medicine see complementary and alternative medicine.
aviation medicine the branch of medicine that deals with the physiologic, medical, psychologic, and epidemiologic problems involved in flying.
ayurvedic medicine the traditional medicine of India, done according to Hindu scriptures and making use of plants and other healing materials native to India.
behavioral medicine a type of psychosomatic medicine focused on psychological means of influencing physical symptoms, such as biofeedback or relaxation.
clinical medicine
1. the study of disease by direct examination of the living patient.
2. the last two years of the usual curriculum in a medical college.
complementary medicine (complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)) a large and diverse set of systems of diagnosis, treatment, and prevention based on philosophies and techniques other than those used in conventional Western medicine, often derived from traditions of medical practice used in other, non-Western cultures. Such practices may be described as alternative, that is, existing as a body separate from and as a replacement for conventional Western medicine, or complementary, that is, used in addition to conventional Western practice. CAM is characterized by its focus on the whole person as a unique individual, on the energy of the body and its influence on health and disease, on the healing power of nature and the mobilization of the body's own resources to heal itself, and on the treatment of the underlying causes, rather than symptoms, of disease. Many of the techniques used are the subject of controversy and have not been validated by controlled studies.
emergency medicine the medical specialty that deals with the acutely ill or injured who require immediate medical treatment. See also emergency and emergency care.
experimental medicine study of the science of healing diseases based on experimentation in animals.
family medicine family practice.
forensic medicine the application of medical knowledge to questions of law; see also medical jurisprudence. Called also legal medicine.
group medicine the practice of medicine by a group of physicians, usually representing various specialties, who are associated together for the cooperative diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.
internal medicine the medical specialty that deals with diagnosis and medical treatment of diseases and disorders of internal structures of the body.
legal medicine forensic medicine.
nuclear medicine the branch of medicine concerned with the use of radionuclides in diagnosis and treatment of disease.
patent medicine a drug or remedy protected by a trademark, available without a prescription.
physical medicine physiatry.
preclinical medicine the subjects studied in medicine before the student observes actual diseases in patients.
preventive medicine the branch of medical study and practice aimed at preventing disease and promoting health.
proprietary medicine any chemical, drug, or similar preparation used in the treatment of diseases, if such article is protected against free competition as to name, product, composition, or process of manufacture by secrecy, patent, trademark, or copyright, or by other means.
psychosomatic medicine the study of the interrelations between bodily processes and emotional life.
socialized medicine a system of medical care regulated and controlled by the government; called also state medicine.
space medicine the branch of aviation medicine concerned with conditions encountered by human beings in space.
sports medicine the field of medicine concerned with injuries sustained in athletic endeavors, including their prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.
state medicine socialized medicine.
travel medicine (travelers' medicine) the subspecialty of tropical medicine consisting of the diagnosis and treatment or prevention of diseases of travelers.
tropical medicine medical science as applied to diseases occurring primarily in the tropics and subtropics.
veterinary medicine the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of animals other than humans.

sports med·i·cine

a field of medicine that uses a holistic, comprehensive, and multidisciplinary approach to health care for those patients engaged in a sporting or recreational activity.

sports medicine

n.
The branch of medicine that deals with injuries or illnesses resulting from participation in sports and athletic activities.

sports medicine

a branch of medicine that specializes in the prevention and treatment of injuries resulting from training for and participation in athletic events. More than 1 million people are treated for sports injuries each year in the United States. Most sports injuries involve muscle sprains, strains, and tears, which frequently result from inadequate preliminary "warm-up" exercises. Among the most common sports injuries are shin splints, runner's knee, pulled hamstring muscles, Achilles tendonitis, ankle sprain, arch sprain, charley horse, tennis elbow, baseball finger, dislocations, muscle cramps, bursitis, myofascitis, costochondritis, hernia, and "Little League elbow."

sport-and-exercise medicine

A UK term (Sports Medicine in US) for a specialty usually practised by orthopaedic surgeons or rehabilitation medicine doctors, which is involved in the care of atheletes, either amateur or professional.

sports medicine

Medtalk A health subspecialty usually practiced by orthopedic surgeons or by rehabilitation medicine physicians, involved in care of those who spring, sprint, splash, smash, whack, whoosh, bang, bash, bat, bounce, bogey or bop, for play or pay. See Anabolic steroids, Boxing, Exercise, Exercise-associated amenorrhea, Running, Sports dermatology, Sports injury. Cf Performing arts medicine.

sports med·i·cine

(spōrts med'i-sin)
A field of medicine that uses a holistic, comprehensive, and multidisciplinary approach to health care for those engaged in a sporting or recreational activity.

sports medicine

The branch of medicine concerned with the physiology of exercise and its application to the improvement of athletic performance and fitness, and with the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions caused by, or related to, sporting activities of all kinds.

sports med·i·cine

(spōrts med'i-sin)
Field of medicine that uses a holistic, comprehensive, and multidisciplinary approach to health care for patients engaged in a sporting or recreational activity.

sports medicine,

n a branch of medicine that specializes in the prevention and treatment of injuries from training and participation in athletic activities.
References in periodicals archive ?
3) Department of Sports Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
Global Joint Repair Devices in Sports Medicine Market 2015-2019
New machines, which promote health and ensure the safety of athletes, have contributed to the development of sports medicine and its important and unavoidable role in life of professional athletes as well as everyday health driven exercise practices of individuals all over the world.
The appointment is an indication of the high regard in which Australian sports medicine is held throughout the world," said Dr Brukner, who will spend the next month at Liverpool observing the set up before returning to Melbourne in May to help prepare the Socceroos for the World Cup.
We expected that the residents in programs with sports medicine fellowships would show superior performance on the non-musculoskeletal sports medicine items.
Students learn about legal issues, nutrition, protective sports equipment, taping and wrapping, mechanisms of injury, environmental safety issues, and the application of other sports medicine concepts.
On the next level (10-29%), British Journal of Sports Medicine continued upwards to 2.
Sports medicine (1) has evolved during the 20th century.
Already a doctor (MD, University of Miami School of Medicine, 1991), when she took up running, Adirim became a fellow in primary care sports medicine in 2000 and for years worked as an attending physician in both sports medicine and emergency medicine at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.
The Nicholas Institute of Sports Medicine and Athletic Trauma (NISMAT) is the first hospital-based facility dedicated to the study of sports medicine in the country.
Comprehensive and detailed, its focus is on the content necessary to pass the CAQ in Sports Medicine offered by the American Board of Pediatrics and the American Board of Family Practitioners.
Bronze winners included Liliana Hernandez in first aid/CPR; Anthony Trujillo in knowledge test for pathophysiology/creative problem solving; Luz Alvarez in first aid/CPR; Tyler Meredith for sports medicine and Jonathan DeGuzman for prepared speaking.

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