sporocyst


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Related to sporocyst: Miracidium, Metacercariae, Miracidia, rediae

sporocyst

 [spor´o-sist]
1. any cyst or sac containing spores or reproductive cells; the oocyst of certain protozoa in which sporozoites develop.
2. the larval stages of flukes in snails.

spo·ro·cyst

(spō'rō-sist),
1. A larval form of digenetic trematode (fluke) that develops in the body of its molluscan intermediate host, usually a snail; the sporocyst forms a simple saclike structure with germinal cells that bud off internally and develop into other larval types that continue this process of larval multiplication (considered to be a form of polyembryony).
See also: miracidium, redia, cercaria.
2. A secondary cyst that develops within the oocyst of Coccidia, a group of sporozoans that includes many of the most important disease agents of domestic animals and fowl; the sporocyst develops from a sporoblast and produces within itself one or several sporozoites, the infective agents for infection and multiplication in the next host.
[sporo- + G. kystis, bladder]

sporocyst

/spo·ro·cyst/ (-sist)
1. any cyst or sac containing spores or reproductive cells.
2. a germinal saclike stage in the life cycle of digenetic trematodes, produced by metamorphosis of a miracidium and giving rise to rediae.
3. a stage in the life cycle of certain coccidian protozoa, contained within the oocyst, produced by a sporoblast, and giving rise to sporozoites.

sporocyst

(spôr′ə-sĭst′)
n.
1. A resting cell that produces asexual plant spores.
2. A protective structure containing the infective sporozoites of an apicomplexan parasite.
3. A saclike larval stage in many trematodes, from which the rediae emerge.

sporocyst

[spôr′əsist]
Etymology: Gk, sporos + kystis, bag
1 any structure containing spores or reproductive cells.
2 a saclike structure, or oocyst, secreted by the zygote of certain protists before sporozoite formation.
3 the second larval stage in the life cycle of parasitic flukes. The saclike organism develops from the miracidium, or first larval stage, in the body of a freshwater snail host and contains germinal cells that give rise either to daughter sporocysts that develop into cercariae or to rediae. See also fluke.

spo·ro·cyst

(spōr'ō-sist)
1. A larval form of digenetic trematode (fluke) that develops in the body of its molluscan intermediate host, usually a snail.
See also: cercaria
2. A secondary cyst that develops within the oocyst of Coccidia, a group of sporozoans that includes many of the most important disease agents of domestic animals and fowl.
[sporo- + G. kystis, bladder]

sporocyst

a cyst producing asexual spores.

sporocyst

1. any cyst or sac containing spores or reproductive cells; contained in the oocyst of coccidia in which sporozoites develop.
2. the larval stages of flukes in snails.
References in periodicals archive ?
In ovaries, sporocysts containing germinal balls and developing cercariae in a wide range of developmental stages were detected (Fig.
4 Sporocysts size, Caryospora Sporocyst [micro]m (range, [micro]m) species shape Reference interval (1) C kutzeri Ovoid 22.
middendorfi in Russia were reported to lack a Stieda body and discernible sporocyst residuum (Arnastauskene, 1980).
host follows miracidium (61) La cercaria stage developing in snail follows mother sporocyst
In both cases the parasite was observed as sporocyst and cercariae stages, according to the description in Marchiori et al.
In the snail the fork-tailed cercariae asexually develop following two sporocyst stages (within 3 to 5 weeks) and leave the snail.
5 Stieda bodies A prominent stieda body present; sub- and parastieda bodies absent Sporocyst residuum Prominent; made up of clumped globules Micropyle Absent Sporozoites Two per sporocyst 10-13 by 1.
Trematodes in the digestive tract of bivalve mollusks is common and can be associated with true damages depending on the species; for example, sporocyst containing cercariae of Proctoeces macidatus or Cercaria tapidis may induce castration in the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis and in the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum, respectively (Robledo et al.