sporangium


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spo·ran·gi·um

(spō-ran'jē-ŭm),
A saclike structure (a cell) within a fungus, in which asexual spores are borne by progressive cleavage.
[L. fr. G. sporos, seed, + angeion, vessel]

sporangium

/spo·ran·gi·um/ (spah-ran´je-um) pl. sporan´gia   any encystment containing spores or sporelike bodies, as in certain fungi.

sporangium

(spə-răn′jē-əm)
n. pl. sporan·gia (-jē-ə)
A single-celled or many-celled structure in which spores are produced, especially in fungi, algae, mosses, and ferns. Also called spore case.

spo·ran′gi·al (-jē-əl) adj.

spo·ran·gi·um

(spōr-anj'ē-ŭm)
A saclike structure (a cell) within a fungus, in which asexual spores are borne by progressive cleavage.
[L. fr. G. sporos, seed, + angeion, vessel]

sporangium

(pl. sporangia) the structure within which asexual SPORES are formed.

sporangium

any cyst which contains spores or spore-like bodies.
References in periodicals archive ?
A continuous supply of mature spores are elevated by growth of the sporangium and released by terminal slits in the sporangium wall.
Plant of granite outcrops (rarely sandstone); sporangium brown and less than 6 mm long I.
ramboi it covers almost all of the sporangium, whereas in I.
The sporocytes develop pliable walls, expand rapidly and are released from the archesporial cell walls into the mucilaginous matrix of the sporangium.
This matrix causes the sporangium to stick to herbaceous material when discharged, but makes it difficult to treat the individual spores with enzymes.
25] and pale-green with whitish-pale bases; sporangium [+ or -]unmarked and with [+ or -]10% velum coverage; megaspore surface mealy, sparsely to (uncommonly) densely ornamented with [+ or -]obscure tubercles and/or narrow muri [Fig.
Eames (1936), for example, suggests that the resemblances between the leaves and sporangium position of Asteroxylon, Drepanophycus and Baragwanathia, on the one hand, and of Lycopodium, on the other, together with stelar structure, support the enation hypothesis.
Sixty-four spores per sporangium were found, and homologous chromosomes paired normally, which suggests it is a sexually reproducing diploid (Wang et al.
Microspores from a single sporangium were removed from herbarium specimens (Appendix 1), sputter coated with gold palladium, and examined with a LEO scanning electron microscope.
Sporangium produced by axis: 0 = present; 2 = absent.
All three studied species are reported to be triploids (2n = 3x = 123) with 32 spores per sporangium as shown by Lu et al.
2 mm wide; sporangia attached near vein endings, becoming confluent at maturity, partially covered by false indusium; spores 32 per sporangium, 60.