spontaneous remission


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spon·ta·ne·ous re·mis·sion

disappearance of symptoms without formal treatment.

spontaneous remission

1 the reversal of progress of disease without formal treatment.
2 the disappearance of symptoms of a mentally ill patient without formal treatment.

spon·ta·ne·ous re·mis·sion

(spon-tā'nē-us rē-mis'shŭn)
Disappearance of symptoms without formal treatment.

spontaneous remission,

n phrase used by medical professionals to describe a patient's complete recovery that is inexplicable by medical means.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are reported cases of spontaneous remission of cancer following vaccination and a number of clinical trials in progress administering vaccines to treat cancer.
However, as reported by Hoxha, PLA2R-Ab negative patients seem to have a higher percentage of spontaneous remission than positive patients, and the use of immunosuppressants did not alter the chance to reach remission in negative patients.
Both diseases are autoinflammatory, autosomal recessive immune disorders which are characterized by sterile inflammation and fever attacks with spontaneous remission.
Many patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis will not require treatment, as spontaneous remission is common.
Thus, among HBsAg-positive / HBeAg-negative subjects with normal liver biochemistry, it is important and sometimes difficult to distinguish the 'true inactive HBV carriers' from patients with 'active CHB' in whom phases of spontaneous remission have occurred.
Spontaneous remission of a solitary intraspinal synovial cyst of the lumbar spine.
Although spontaneous remission might occur, sometimes CCF might develop life threatening complications.
Spontaneous remission was only in individuals with normal premorbid and accentuated personality; while it was not detected in psychopathic personalities.
However, in spite of the increasing clinical and immunological evidence supporting the efficacy of IT for the treatment of leishmaniasis, doubts remain because of the high rates of spontaneous remission of leishmaniotic lesions.
Adrian Newland, professor of haematology at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, says: "In people with blood cancers we do sometimes see cases of spontaneous remission as a result of an event in the body, when all traces of the cancer suddenly disappear.
Spontaneous remission occurs in 40% to 55% of UA patients.

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