spontaneous intracranial hypotension


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spontaneous intracranial hypotension

A chronically recurring headache caused by leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) into the epidural space; it worsens when a person stands and improves on lying down It is typically found in those with connective tissue disorders. The leakage of CSF limits the quantity of fluid in which the brain floats, drawing the brain toward the foramen magnum and base of the skull. Applying a blood patch to alleviate the leakage resolves the symptoms in most patients.
See also: hypotension
References in periodicals archive ?
Maya, "Quadriplegia and cerebellar hemorrhage in spontaneous intracranial hypotension," Neurology, vol.
Savino, "Coma resulting from spontaneous intracranial hypotension treated with the epidural blood patch in the Trendelenburg position premedicated with acetazolamide," Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery, vol.
Salvolini, "Spontaneous intracranial hypotension: The value of brain measurements in diagnosis by MRI," Neuroradiology, vol.
Key Words: spontaneous intracranial hypotension, epidural blood patch
Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a rare condition caused by a spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak; it is often misdiagnosed or under-diagnosed (1).
Clinical suspicion of spontaneous intracranial hypotension syndrome (SIH) is suggested by a history of daily headaches that occur shortly after assuming an upright position and are relieved by lying down.
Epidemiology and outcome of postural headache management in spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Reg Anesth Pain Med.
The syndrome of spontaneous intracranial hypotension is caused by a reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume leading to decreased CSF pressure.
Orthostatic headache that improves rapidly in the recumbent position and worsens in the erect position is the classical sign of Spontaneous intracranial hypotension although patients with chronic headaches or even no headaches have been described.6 This pain may be exacerbated by laughing, coughing, jugular venous compression, Valsalva maneuver, and does not respond to analgesic treatment.
Spontaneous intracranial hypotension can be a challenging condition not only to diagnose, but also to treat.
Superficial siderosis following spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Pract Neurol.
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