sponge

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sponge

 [spunj]
a porous, absorbent mass, as a pad of gauze or cotton surrounded by gauze, or the elastic fibrous skeleton of certain species of marine animals.
absorbable gelatin sponge a sterile, absorbable, water-insoluble, gelatin-base material used in the control of bleeding.

sponge

(spŭnj),
1. Absorbent material (for example, gauze, prepared cotton) used to absorb fluids.
2. A member of the phylum Porifera, the cellular endoskeleton of which is a source of commercial sponges.
Synonym(s): spongia
[G. spongia]

sponge

(spunj)
1. a porous, absorbent mass, as a pad of gauze or cotton surrounded by gauze.
2. the elastic fibrous skeleton of certain species of marine animals.

absorbable gelatin sponge  a sterile, absorbable, water-insoluble, gelatin-base material, used as a local hemostatic.

sponge

(spŭnj)
n.
1. A piece of absorbent porous material, such as cellulose, plastic, or rubber, used especially for washing and cleaning.
2. A gauze pad used to absorb blood and other fluids, as in surgery or in dressing a wound.
3. A contraceptive sponge.
v.
To wash, moisten, or absorb with a sponge.

sponge

[spunj]
Etymology: Gk, spongia
1 a resilient absorbent mass used to absorb fluids, to apply medication, or to cleanse. The sponge may be the internal skeleton of a certain marine animal, or it may be manufactured from cellulose, rubber, or synthetic material.
2
Usage notes: (informal)
a folded gauze square used in surgery.

sponge

Contraceptive sponge, see there.

sponge

(spŏnj)
1. Absorbent material (e.g., gauze or prepared cotton) used to absorb fluids.
2. A member of the phylum Porifera, the cellular endoskeleton of which is a source of commercial natural sponges.
[G. spongia ]

sponge

(spunj) [Gr. sphongos, sponge]
1. An elastic, porous mass forming the internal skeleton of certain marine animals; or a rubber or synthetic substance that resembles a sponge in properties and appearance. Synonym: spongia
2. An absorbent pad made of gauze and cotton used to absorb fluids and blood in surgery or to dress wounds.
3. Short term for sponge bath.
4. To moisten, clean, cool, or wipe with a sponge.

abdominal sponge

A flat sponge formerly used during surgery as packing to prevent closing or obstruction by intrusion of viscera, as covering to prevent tissue injury, and as absorbents.
Enlarge picture
CONTRACEPTIVE SPONGE

contraceptive sponge

A sponge impregnated with a spermicide. It is used intravaginally during sexual intercourse as a method of contraception. See: illustration
Synonym: spermicidal sponge See: contraceptive

gauze sponge

A sterile pad made of absorbent material. It is used during surgery and in wound dressing materials.

gelatin sponge

A spongy protein derived from animal collagen. It can be used to arrest local bleeding intraoperatively, to embolize blood vessels, or to form a protective coating around recently manipulated tissues.

spermicidal sponge

Contraceptive sponge.

sponge

any member of the phylum Porifera. Sponges are multicellular organisms though many biologists regard them as colonies of single cells. Several types of cells exist in a sponge but they are functionally independent of one another and can exist on their own, or in small isolated groups. Usually they possess an internal skeleton of separate crystalline spicules, irregular organic fibres (as, for example, a bath sponge) or both.

sponge

a porous, absorbent mass, as a pad of gauze or cotton surrounded by gauze, or the elastic fibrous skeleton of certain species of marine animals.

sponge forceps
gelatin sponge (absorbable)
a spongy form of denatured gelatin, soaked with thrombin and used for topical hemostasis.
References in periodicals archive ?
spongia is monoecious, forming either male or female inflorescences on fertile ramets.
Spongia (Toasted sponge): Dry, barking cough that sounds like a saw cutting through wood.
Spongia 6c is helpful for the barking, croaking cough with hoarseness that can bealleviatedby eating and drinking, and with keeping the headlying low.
07 (1) Thalassia testudinum (2) Halimeda opuntia (3) Caulerpa racemosa (4) Small bare space (5) Wide bare space (6) Haliclona viridis (7) Tedania ignis (8) Spongia sp.
But latrunculins occur within other sponge species such as Spongia mycofijiensis (Crews et al.
14) Eggs were a prominent item in the Roman diet,(15) and, while they were sometimes hard-boiled (ova elixa)(16) or well cooked by other methods, they were also used in ways which would violate the modern safety rules for ducks' eggs: they were served soft-boiled (ova hapala);(17) they were made into lightly cooked, milky omelettes (ova spongia ex lacte);(18) and they were preserved and stored.