sponge

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sponge

 [spunj]
a porous, absorbent mass, as a pad of gauze or cotton surrounded by gauze, or the elastic fibrous skeleton of certain species of marine animals.
absorbable gelatin sponge a sterile, absorbable, water-insoluble, gelatin-base material used in the control of bleeding.

sponge

(spŭnj),
1. Absorbent material (for example, gauze, prepared cotton) used to absorb fluids.
2. A member of the phylum Porifera, the cellular endoskeleton of which is a source of commercial sponges.
Synonym(s): spongia
[G. spongia]

sponge

(spunj)
1. a porous, absorbent mass, as a pad of gauze or cotton surrounded by gauze.
2. the elastic fibrous skeleton of certain species of marine animals.

absorbable gelatin sponge  a sterile, absorbable, water-insoluble, gelatin-base material, used as a local hemostatic.

sponge

(spŭnj)
n.
1. A piece of absorbent porous material, such as cellulose, plastic, or rubber, used especially for washing and cleaning.
2. A gauze pad used to absorb blood and other fluids, as in surgery or in dressing a wound.
3. A contraceptive sponge.
v.
To wash, moisten, or absorb with a sponge.

sponge

[spunj]
Etymology: Gk, spongia
1 a resilient absorbent mass used to absorb fluids, to apply medication, or to cleanse. The sponge may be the internal skeleton of a certain marine animal, or it may be manufactured from cellulose, rubber, or synthetic material.
2
Usage notes: (informal)
a folded gauze square used in surgery.

sponge

Contraceptive sponge, see there.

sponge

(spŏnj)
1. Absorbent material (e.g., gauze or prepared cotton) used to absorb fluids.
2. A member of the phylum Porifera, the cellular endoskeleton of which is a source of commercial natural sponges.
[G. spongia ]

sponge

(spunj) [Gr. sphongos, sponge]
1. An elastic, porous mass forming the internal skeleton of certain marine animals; or a rubber or synthetic substance that resembles a sponge in properties and appearance. Synonym: spongia
2. An absorbent pad made of gauze and cotton used to absorb fluids and blood in surgery or to dress wounds.
3. Short term for sponge bath.
4. To moisten, clean, cool, or wipe with a sponge.

abdominal sponge

A flat sponge formerly used during surgery as packing to prevent closing or obstruction by intrusion of viscera, as covering to prevent tissue injury, and as absorbents.
Enlarge picture
CONTRACEPTIVE SPONGE

contraceptive sponge

A sponge impregnated with a spermicide. It is used intravaginally during sexual intercourse as a method of contraception. See: illustration
Synonym: spermicidal sponge See: contraceptive

gauze sponge

A sterile pad made of absorbent material. It is used during surgery and in wound dressing materials.

gelatin sponge

A spongy protein derived from animal collagen. It can be used to arrest local bleeding intraoperatively, to embolize blood vessels, or to form a protective coating around recently manipulated tissues.

spermicidal sponge

Contraceptive sponge.

sponge

any member of the phylum Porifera. Sponges are multicellular organisms though many biologists regard them as colonies of single cells. Several types of cells exist in a sponge but they are functionally independent of one another and can exist on their own, or in small isolated groups. Usually they possess an internal skeleton of separate crystalline spicules, irregular organic fibres (as, for example, a bath sponge) or both.

sponge

a porous, absorbent mass, as a pad of gauze or cotton surrounded by gauze, or the elastic fibrous skeleton of certain species of marine animals.

sponge forceps
gelatin sponge (absorbable)
a spongy form of denatured gelatin, soaked with thrombin and used for topical hemostasis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sponges are also capable of spreading bacteria in places where it was not previously present.
Merchant Walid Zein lamented the situation saying that the market was drowning in Egyptian sponges.
With respect to animal morphology, Vacelet and Donadey (1977) observed early on that the HMA sponges generally display a denser mesohyl, narrower aquiferous canals, and smaller choanoycte chambers than their LMA counterparts.
When the cakes are cool, spread the jam on one of the sponge cakes (if using) and spread half of the whipped cream on top.
There is limited information on sponges in Nebraska.
Food is tremendously nostalgic and this recipe conjures up memories of being given a wooden spoon and the near-empty mixing bowl as a treat while patiently sitting cross legged on the kitchen floor, watching through the oven door as the sponge would start to magically rise and colour.
Wring sponges out after each use, and store them where they can dry thoroughly.
Comparison with other animals supports the idea that sponges form the base of the animal branch of life's evolutionary tree, says April Hill, a developmental biologist at the University of Richmond in Virginia.
Traveling to the Dutch Antilles with his student, Anna De Kluijver, De Goeij started SCUBA diving with the sponges to find out how much carbon they consume.
It is estimated that sponges are left in patients in between 1 in 2,000 and 1 in 6,000 surgeries in the United States, according to a 2000 report published in the World Journal of Surgery.
The idea of the SmartSponge System dates back to the mid-90s when Sharon Morris, RN, a co-founder of the company was working as an operating room nurse traveling to different medical institutions and experiencing the methods for counting sponges and instruments during procedures.