sponge

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sponge

 [spunj]
a porous, absorbent mass, as a pad of gauze or cotton surrounded by gauze, or the elastic fibrous skeleton of certain species of marine animals.
absorbable gelatin sponge a sterile, absorbable, water-insoluble, gelatin-base material used in the control of bleeding.

sponge

(spŭnj),
1. Absorbent material (for example, gauze, prepared cotton) used to absorb fluids.
2. A member of the phylum Porifera, the cellular endoskeleton of which is a source of commercial sponges.
Synonym(s): spongia
[G. spongia]

sponge

(spunj)
1. a porous, absorbent mass, as a pad of gauze or cotton surrounded by gauze.
2. the elastic fibrous skeleton of certain species of marine animals.

absorbable gelatin sponge  a sterile, absorbable, water-insoluble, gelatin-base material, used as a local hemostatic.

sponge

(spŭnj)
n.
1. A piece of absorbent porous material, such as cellulose, plastic, or rubber, used especially for washing and cleaning.
2. A gauze pad used to absorb blood and other fluids, as in surgery or in dressing a wound.
3. A contraceptive sponge.
v.
To wash, moisten, or absorb with a sponge.

sponge

[spunj]
Etymology: Gk, spongia
1 a resilient absorbent mass used to absorb fluids, to apply medication, or to cleanse. The sponge may be the internal skeleton of a certain marine animal, or it may be manufactured from cellulose, rubber, or synthetic material.
2
Usage notes: (informal)
a folded gauze square used in surgery.

sponge

Contraceptive sponge, see there.

sponge

(spŏnj)
1. Absorbent material (e.g., gauze or prepared cotton) used to absorb fluids.
2. A member of the phylum Porifera, the cellular endoskeleton of which is a source of commercial natural sponges.
[G. spongia ]

sponge

(spunj) [Gr. sphongos, sponge]
1. An elastic, porous mass forming the internal skeleton of certain marine animals; or a rubber or synthetic substance that resembles a sponge in properties and appearance. Synonym: spongia
2. An absorbent pad made of gauze and cotton used to absorb fluids and blood in surgery or to dress wounds.
3. Short term for sponge bath.
4. To moisten, clean, cool, or wipe with a sponge.

abdominal sponge

A flat sponge formerly used during surgery as packing to prevent closing or obstruction by intrusion of viscera, as covering to prevent tissue injury, and as absorbents.
Enlarge picture
CONTRACEPTIVE SPONGE

contraceptive sponge

A sponge impregnated with a spermicide. It is used intravaginally during sexual intercourse as a method of contraception. See: illustration
Synonym: spermicidal sponge See: contraceptive

gauze sponge

A sterile pad made of absorbent material. It is used during surgery and in wound dressing materials.

gelatin sponge

A spongy protein derived from animal collagen. It can be used to arrest local bleeding intraoperatively, to embolize blood vessels, or to form a protective coating around recently manipulated tissues.

spermicidal sponge

Contraceptive sponge.

sponge

any member of the phylum Porifera. Sponges are multicellular organisms though many biologists regard them as colonies of single cells. Several types of cells exist in a sponge but they are functionally independent of one another and can exist on their own, or in small isolated groups. Usually they possess an internal skeleton of separate crystalline spicules, irregular organic fibres (as, for example, a bath sponge) or both.

sponge

a porous, absorbent mass, as a pad of gauze or cotton surrounded by gauze, or the elastic fibrous skeleton of certain species of marine animals.

sponge forceps
gelatin sponge (absorbable)
a spongy form of denatured gelatin, soaked with thrombin and used for topical hemostasis.
References in periodicals archive ?
1976) the metazoans are derived from a cellularized ciliate and the epithelial eumetazoan guts from ciliated canals in spongelike ancestors; the theories of Rieger (1994) and Dewel (2000) similarly describe the eumetazoan gut as derived from an (unspecified) sponge-like organization.
One well would be used to inject the slurry of sterilized waste into the spongelike sandstone where oil has been extracted.
Mad cow (also called BSE or bovine spongiform encephalopathy) is a fatal cattle disease that causes spongelike holes in the brain, making the infected animal stagger--thus the descriptive term "mad" cow.
For an artist renowned for his spongelike capacity to take in whatever was immediately at hand and spit it back out with his unmistakable imprint, the US represented a bonanza of cultural source material of all kinds.
Most warm-season grasses develop thatch, a spongelike layer of roots, runners, and grass blades just above the soil surface.
This type of unit is often called a wicking humidifier because it uses a large "wick" or spongelike material that draws water upward through capillary action.
Radio commands signaled the PLC to actuate the valve, releasing gas that fired the spongelike ammunition into the audience.
Diffuse-type GCTs form large, firm to spongelike, often clefted masses.
The darker blobs are the crystalline solids yttrium dihydride and vanadium dihydride, materials that are being developed as spongelike containers for storing hydrogen.
When hair is cut, the shaft dries out and gives hair its spongelike affinity for oil.
It is generally accepted that the instantaneous demixing leads to a macrovoid structure, while delayed demixing leads to a spongelike structure in the cross section (30).
The trials involved applying the epoxy and a hard, spongelike material to pavement during the summer, and then using a light coating of a de-icing chemical in November.