sponge


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sponge

 [spunj]
a porous, absorbent mass, as a pad of gauze or cotton surrounded by gauze, or the elastic fibrous skeleton of certain species of marine animals.
absorbable gelatin sponge a sterile, absorbable, water-insoluble, gelatin-base material used in the control of bleeding.

sponge

(spŭnj),
1. Absorbent material (for example, gauze, prepared cotton) used to absorb fluids.
2. A member of the phylum Porifera, the cellular endoskeleton of which is a source of commercial sponges.
Synonym(s): spongia
[G. spongia]

sponge

(spunj)
1. a porous, absorbent mass, as a pad of gauze or cotton surrounded by gauze.
2. the elastic fibrous skeleton of certain species of marine animals.

absorbable gelatin sponge  a sterile, absorbable, water-insoluble, gelatin-base material, used as a local hemostatic.

sponge

(spŭnj)
n.
1. A piece of absorbent porous material, such as cellulose, plastic, or rubber, used especially for washing and cleaning.
2. A gauze pad used to absorb blood and other fluids, as in surgery or in dressing a wound.
3. A contraceptive sponge.
v.
To wash, moisten, or absorb with a sponge.

sponge

[spunj]
Etymology: Gk, spongia
1 a resilient absorbent mass used to absorb fluids, to apply medication, or to cleanse. The sponge may be the internal skeleton of a certain marine animal, or it may be manufactured from cellulose, rubber, or synthetic material.
2
Usage notes: (informal)
a folded gauze square used in surgery.

sponge

Contraceptive sponge, see there.

sponge

(spŏnj)
1. Absorbent material (e.g., gauze or prepared cotton) used to absorb fluids.
2. A member of the phylum Porifera, the cellular endoskeleton of which is a source of commercial natural sponges.
[G. spongia ]

sponge

(spunj) [Gr. sphongos, sponge]
1. An elastic, porous mass forming the internal skeleton of certain marine animals; or a rubber or synthetic substance that resembles a sponge in properties and appearance. Synonym: spongia
2. An absorbent pad made of gauze and cotton used to absorb fluids and blood in surgery or to dress wounds.
3. Short term for sponge bath.
4. To moisten, clean, cool, or wipe with a sponge.

abdominal sponge

A flat sponge formerly used during surgery as packing to prevent closing or obstruction by intrusion of viscera, as covering to prevent tissue injury, and as absorbents.
Enlarge picture
CONTRACEPTIVE SPONGE

contraceptive sponge

A sponge impregnated with a spermicide. It is used intravaginally during sexual intercourse as a method of contraception. See: illustration
Synonym: spermicidal sponge See: contraceptive

gauze sponge

A sterile pad made of absorbent material. It is used during surgery and in wound dressing materials.

gelatin sponge

A spongy protein derived from animal collagen. It can be used to arrest local bleeding intraoperatively, to embolize blood vessels, or to form a protective coating around recently manipulated tissues.

spermicidal sponge

Contraceptive sponge.

sponge

any member of the phylum Porifera. Sponges are multicellular organisms though many biologists regard them as colonies of single cells. Several types of cells exist in a sponge but they are functionally independent of one another and can exist on their own, or in small isolated groups. Usually they possess an internal skeleton of separate crystalline spicules, irregular organic fibres (as, for example, a bath sponge) or both.

sponge

a porous, absorbent mass, as a pad of gauze or cotton surrounded by gauze, or the elastic fibrous skeleton of certain species of marine animals.

sponge forceps
gelatin sponge (absorbable)
a spongy form of denatured gelatin, soaked with thrombin and used for topical hemostasis.
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to conduct the study, researchers used a method called DNA pyrosequencing to sequence the DNA of 28 samples of bacteria collected from 14 different kitchen sponges taken from private households in Baden-WAaAaAeA rttemberg, German
Locally grown loofah sponges are inexpensive but their popularity has waned over other varieties of sponges imported from Egypt.
Altogether 45 sponge species were included in the phylogenetic tree, and the GenBank accession numbers are provided in Figure 3.
Lethal and sublethal effects of sponge overgrowth on introduced dreissenid mussels in the Great Lakes--St.
It's on these points that No Thing Left Behind[R]'s manual Sponge ACCOUNTing practice was developed.
Wring sponges out after each use, and store them where they can dry thoroughly.
Sponges don't make some body parts, such as muscles, nerves and epithelial tissues like skin or gut linings, that are found in more complex animals.
Once the oil comes into this smart sponge structure," Reed says, "it can't be released under any amount of pressure," he added.
If left inside, the sponge usually has to be removed with another surgery.
NEW YORK -- Such bath accessories as sponges, scrubbers and body brushes are a natural complement to soaps and body washes, offering an opportunity for retailers to extend sales in the segment.
On this occasion, the sponge was found after Golden Velvet's groom reported a strong odour coming from the five-year-old.