spondylosis

(redirected from spondylosis deformans)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

spondylosis

 [spon″dĭ-lo´sis]
1. ankylosis of a vertebral joint.
2. degenerative spinal changes due to osteoarthritis.

spon·dy·lo·sis

(spon'di-lō'sis),
Ankylosis of the vertebra; often applied nonspecifically to any lesion of the spine of a degenerative nature.
[G. spondylos, vertebra]

spondylosis

/spon·dy·lo·sis/ (spon″dĭ-lo´sis)
1. ankylosis of a vertebral joint.
2. degenerative spinal changes due to osteoarthritis.

rhizomelic spondylosis  ankylosing spondylitis.

spondylosis

(spŏn′dl-ō′sĭs)
n.
Degeneration of the spinal column, especially that resulting in abnormal fusion and immobilization of the vertebral bones.

spondylosis

[spon′dilō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, sphondylos + osis
a condition of the spine characterized by fixation or stiffness of a vertebral joint. See also ankylosing spondylitis, spondylitis.
enlarge picture
Spondylosis

spondylosis

Orthopedics Abnormal vertebral fixation or immobility. See Cervical spondylosis.

spon·dy·lo·sis

(spon'di-lō'sis)
Ankylosis of the vertebrae; often applied nonspecifically to any lesion of the spine of a degenerative nature.
[G. spondylos, vertebra]

Spondylosis

Arthritis of the spine.
Mentioned in: Scoliosis

spondylosis

spinal ankylosis

spondylosis (spônˈ·d·lōˑ·l·sis),

n 1., fusion of adjacent vertebraeh.
2., condition characterized by the breakdown of the pars interarticularis (the thin strip of bone that connects the inferior and superior facets of a vertebra), maldevelopment of the vertebral arch, or flattening and breakdown of the vertebra. Also called
prespondylolisthesis.

spondylosis

ankylosis of a vertebral joint; also, a general term for degenerative changes in the spine. Commonly seen in dogs. In aged bulls spondylosis can cause pain in the back. There is difficulty rising, weakness, unsteadiness, knuckling and toe-dragging with the hind hooves.

spondylosis deformans
a chronic disease of the vertebrae, especially in the lumbar area, in old bulls, especially those in artificial insemination centers, and old dogs. There is degenerative arthropathy at the articular processes and osteophyte development along the ventral edge of the vertebrae. The lesions are visible radiographically but there may be no clinical signs unless the new bone is injured. When this happens the affected animals are reluctant to rise or move their backs because of the pain that movement causes.