spondee


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spon·dee

(spon'dē),
A bisyllabic word with equivalent stress on each syllable; used in the testing of hearing for speech.
[Fr.]

spon·dee

(spon-dē)
A bisyllabic word with generally equivalent stress on each of the two syllables; used in the testing of speech hearing.
[Fr.]

spondee

(spon′dē″) [L. spondeus, fr Gr. spondeios, pert. to or used in a libation, fr spondē, libation]
A two-syllable word that receives an equal or nearly equal accent on each syllable, e.g., toothbrush, football. Spondaic words are use in audiometry to test for acuity and to establish an auditory baseline
spondaic (spon-dā″ik), adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
Metrically speaking, besides their basic contribution to sentence meaning, these compounds permit the inclusion of additional spondees and stressed syllables into the text, something true adjectives can rarely do.
Moreover, to consider one technique of meter, Simms deftly uses spondees to suggest effects of fullness in several instances: "Too far" (2), "much / too choice"(3), "set / much bet / ter" (4), and "wide wood" (11).
Spondee recognition threshold as a function of set size.
The fact that Greek had a number of verse feet (anapest, dactyl, trochee, spondee) but only a single phonological foot (moraic trochee) shows us that the feet used in meter and the feet used in phonology and prosodic morphology MUST BE distinct.
A pyrrhic foot consists of two unstressed syllables, and a spondee, two long ones.
However much a poet like Robert Pinsky might seem connected to the general culture, poetry like his remains a guild activity: Its authors may play baseball and surf the Net--they may even attend poetry slams and package their books with CDs--but they also read Fulke Greville and know a trochee from a spondee. And while it is easy to see what might be bad about this situation, it is harder to see what's good about it.
(16) Assuming scansion of `alveo' as a spondee with synizesis (cf.
Jerome - is a somewhat limited reward, and less than you might expect, for so much effort but the breezy style of presentation should sustain enthusiasm, though I'm not sure I really approve of the comment on scansion of dactyl and spondee: `Basically, think belly-dancer.
In a prose note for his Latin ode to John Rous, Milton says that "there are two Phaleucian verses which admit a spondee in the third foot, a practice which Catullus freely followed in the second foot'".(10) Although the English edition of Catullus' poems according to Rierdon 'did not appear until 1684', continental editions were without a doubt available to Milton.(11) He may well have seen the commentary of Antonio Partenio da Lazise (1456-1506) published in 1485 which according to Julia Gaisser 'proved so popular that it was reprinted five times in the fifteen years after its first publication'.(12) Among the various passages in Partenio's text, Gaisser mentions his comments on Catullus, 15.19, where 'he adds irrelevantly: "In Germany radishes grow as large as babies.
Variations on the traditional alcaic include the use of a long initial syllable and of a spondee (- -) in the first complete foot of the first three lines.
At the beginning of his career he formed an alliance with <IR> ROYALL TYLER </IR> and together they published satirical pieces under the pseudonym <IR> COLON </IR> (Dennie) <IR> AND SPONDEE </IR> (Tyler).
The four most common feet in English verse are the jamb, trochee, anapest, and dactyl; occasional variations, such as the spondee and pyrrhic, occur.