spondee


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spon·dee

(spon'dē),
A bisyllabic word with equivalent stress on each syllable; used in the testing of hearing for speech.
[Fr.]

spon·dee

(spon-dē)
A bisyllabic word with generally equivalent stress on each of the two syllables; used in the testing of speech hearing.
[Fr.]

spondee

(spon′dē″) [L. spondeus, fr Gr. spondeios, pert. to or used in a libation, fr spondē, libation]
A two-syllable word that receives an equal or nearly equal accent on each syllable, e.g., toothbrush, football. Spondaic words are use in audiometry to test for acuity and to establish an auditory baseline
spondaic (spon-dā″ik), adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
18) Two lines later, the chiming spondees "still women" and "filched year" are even more recklessly precarious, forcing bodily and social meanings of the thrice-repeated word "women" into competition against a clock that is biological but social too and whose insistence the meter has come by now to represent.
Moreover, sound again unifies the passage with the consonance of g, r, and t sounds and the expressive spondees in the phrases "out- / stretch'd arms" (11) and "but the / old top / is green" (14).
Coleridge writes the eleven-year-old Henry Gillman that he should learn iambs, trochees, spondees, pyrrics, amphimacers, and amphibrachs with the diligence he applies when learning his cyphers from a multiplication table (SWF 2.
Anapestic meter uses four kinds of verse foot: canonical anapests (LLH), spondees (HH), dactyls (HLL), and proceleusmatics (LLLL); and the most common of these is NOT the anapest (LLH) but the spondee (HH), as we will see below.
Indeed, in the very next sentence of this same note, Steele hints that a more tolerant view of pyrrhics and spondees is also found in a piece in David Baker's anthology; if so, I would certainly like to hear more about it.
16) Assuming scansion of `alveo' as a spondee with synizesis (cf.
In a prose note for his Latin ode to John Rous, Milton says that "there are two Phaleucian verses which admit a spondee in the third foot, a practice which Catullus freely followed in the second foot'".
Variations on the traditional alcaic include the use of a long initial syllable and of a spondee (- -) in the first complete foot of the first three lines.
At the beginning of his career he formed an alliance with <IR> ROYALL TYLER </IR> and together they published satirical pieces under the pseudonym <IR> COLON </IR> (Dennie) <IR> AND SPONDEE </IR> (Tyler).
The four most common feet in English verse are the jamb, trochee, anapest, and dactyl; occasional variations, such as the spondee and pyrrhic, occur.
I agree with the Norton version because the spondee, "Save breed," is a striking stress itself, and the caesura marks a further emphasis on the spondee.
Indeed if stress is relative, then a spondee is, to use Wimsatt and Beardsley's phrasing, "illusory," because "it is impossible to pronounce any two successive syllables in English without some rise or fall of stress--and some rise or fall of stress is all that is needed for a metrical ictus" (158).