decomposition

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decomposition

 [de-kom″po-zish´un]
1. the separation of compound bodies into their constituent principles.
2. deterioration or decay of a substance.

pu·tre·fac·tion

(pyū'trĕ-fak'shŭn),
Decomposition or rotting, the breakdown of organic matter usually by bacterial action, resulting in the formation of other substances of less complex constitution with the evolution of ammonia or its derivatives and hydrogen sulfide; characterized usually by the presence of toxic or malodorous products.
Synonym(s): decay (2) , decomposition
[L. putre-facio, pp. -factus, to make rotten]

decomposition

/de·com·po·si·tion/ (de-kom″pah-zish´un) the separation of compound bodies into their constituent principles.

decomposition

(dē-kŏm′pə-zĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The act or result of decomposing; disintegration.
2.
a. Chemistry Separation into constituents by chemical reaction.
b. Biology Breakdown or decay of organic materials.

de·com′po·si′tion·al adj.

decomposition

[dē′kəmpəsish′ən]
Etymology: L, de + componere, to put together
the breakdown of a substance into simpler chemical forms. decompose, v.

decomposition

The physical putrefaction and decay of a body, which is slowed by immersion in water (especially cold water) or burial (especially in drier soils).

General sequence of external decomposition
• Discolouration of lower abdominal wall, starting in right iliac fossa.
• Distension of abdomen by gas (spread of bowel organisms).
• Discolouration of dependent areas (generalised spread of bacteria to moistest tissues).
• Face and neck turn red and swell.
• “Marbling” branching pattern on skin due to bacterial colonisation of vessels and staining of vessel walls by haemolysis—occurring at ± 1 week of corpse in ambient temperature of 18–20°C.
• Skin blistering and slippage.
• Gross distension of the abdomen, face (protrusion of tongue and eyes) and scrotum.
• Bloody fluid leaks from orifices (2–3 weeks).
• Skin discolouration deepens to dark green or black.
• Maggot infestation with increased tissue destruction.
• Skin slippage from fingers and toes (hinders identification).

Internal decomposition
Proceeds more slowly, and differs by organ:
• Intestine, adrenals and pancreas autolyse within hours.
• Brain liquefies within a month (meningeal haemorrhage/haematoma usually persist).
• Body fat liquefies to yellow fluid filling body cavities.
• Softer tissues and viscera disintegrate over several months.
• Uterus, heart and prostate persist for the longest.
• Skeletalisation with tendons—12–18 months in temperate climate.
• “Bare-bone” skeletalisation—3 years in temperate climate.

pu·tre·fac·tion

(pyū'trĕ-fak'shŭn)
Decomposition or rotting, the breakdown of organic matter, usually by bacterial action, resulting in the formation of other substances of less complex constitution with the evolution of ammonia or its derivatives and hydrogen sulfide; characterized usually by the presence of toxic or malodorous products.
Synonym(s): decay (2) , decomposition.
[L. putre-facio, pp. -factus, to make rotten]

decomposition

Separation into chemical constituents or simpler compounds often as a result of bacterial enzymatic action.

decomposition

  1. the break-up of a chemical substance into two or more simpler substances.
  2. the breakdown of organic material by microorganisms.

decomposition

decay, disintegration or lysis

decomposition

1. biologically speaking, the separation of compound bodies into their constituent principles; the natural process of biodegradation of animal and plant materials. Its occurrence in human and animal foods is a constant threat and preventing it is the prime objective of the food hygienist.
2. statistically speaking, the removal of accountable influences on a set of data so that only variation due to random error remains.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the leaching experiment using spoil 1, acidithiobacilli population strongly correlated with turbidity, iron and optical density (Table 3) indicating that the growth of acidithiobacilli is linked to increased in turbidity, optical density and iron concentrations.
I don't think you can spoil with too much attention to what your kids are doing and thinking and suffering from, but I think you sometimes have to be careful about things.
After seven weeks of bioleaching, the heavy metal recoveries from spoil 1 are copper (81%), cadmium (86%), chromium (34%), nickel (61%), manganese (63%) and zinc (82%), hence the pattern of heavy metal recovery from the spoil is as follows: Cd > Zn > Cu > Ni > Mn > Cr.
1977) found a similar response on disturbed mined land, and observed that increasing slope steepness caused only a small increase in erosion rates on sodic spoil material.
SMR's soil stabiliser transforms excavated spoil into material that can be used as base layers in road building.
They said the turbines would spoil the views of the hills.
I used to journey to the rugby by train, but the whole horrendous journey used to spoil the day out whether we won or lost.
I know we're all a little crazy, but if you can't spoil your dogs, who can you spoil?
Please take care when you are pruning not to spoil the overall shape of plants.
angles may have some merit when reviewing races, but in my opinion they definitely spoil the live event.
Invitation for Bid: Removal and sale of spoil material from the district?