split-brain


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split-brain

(splĭt′brān′)
adj.
Of, relating to, or subjected to surgical separation of the hemispheres of the brain by severing the corpus callosum: split-brain operation to prevent epileptic seizures.
References in periodicals archive ?
2009) Quantum physics and the multiplicity of mind: split-brains, fragmented minds, dissociation, quantum consciousness.
I think this is a particularly Freudian concept, renewed by the split-brain studies by Gazzaniga, and Society of Mind theories by Minsky, etc.
TABLA I CRITERIOS DIAGNOSTICOS DEL SINDROME DE AICARDI Hallazgos mayores Hallazgos menores Espasmos infantiles Anormalidades costales o vertebrales Lacunas coriorretinianas Microftalmia y otras anomalias oculares Coloboma del disco optico EEG con patron split-brain (cerebro dividido) Agenesia de cuerpo calloso Asimetria hemisferica Displasias corticales Heterotopia periventricular Quiste intracraneales interhemisferico Papiloma de plexo coroide Modificado de Aicardi J.
For instance, Lowe ignores philosophical debates over the unity of consciousness that focus on split-brain cases.
I have presented just a small sample of split-brain studies showing that consciousness is not totally divided in these patients.
From the studies of the split-brain, the left brain is more dominant for linguistic abilities, calculations, and math and logic abilities, where the right brain is more dominant for spatial ability (Oono 1996), and it was also reported that the language center of most right-handed people is on the left side of the brain (Kubota 1982; Sakano, 1982).
Consider this analogy: In the early 1960s, Roger Sperry and Ronald Meyers discovered the split-brain effect, in which the two hemispheres of the brain are responsible for different modes of thought and action.
Studies with split-brain patients also have supported the hemispheric differences discussed in the previous section.
The MSCS architecture handles this issue using a single quorum resource in the cluster that is used as the tie-breaker to avoid split-brain scenarios.
She follows this with a brief history of split-brain theory and its relationship to integration, noting that some people are right- or left-brain dominant, while others are able to integrate those features.
Michael Gazzaniga, a prolific author who worked with Roger Sperry on the well-publicized research on split-brain patients, also objects to the idea that certain experiences automatically improve children's brains.
More to the point, however, when the two hemispheres in split-brain patients produce conflicting behavior and the person is then asked to explain why he or she has behaved in this fashion, the left hemisphere will confabulate a reason based on its own limited information.