split-brain


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split-brain

(splĭt′brān′)
adj.
Of, relating to, or subjected to surgical separation of the hemispheres of the brain by severing the corpus callosum: split-brain operation to prevent epileptic seizures.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
But there they were, the split-brain results, available for all to see: if the brain's hemisphere's are disconnected, mental states are disconnected.
The particular functions that are integrated in the split-brain reveal something of the action of the second visual system, and offer a glimpse of how vision itself evolved.
Split-brain experiments involve patients who have had their corpus callosum (a thick, broad band of the brain comprised of millions of nerve fibers) severed.
Consider this analogy: In the early 1960s, Roger Sperry and Ronald Meyers discovered the split-brain effect, in which the two hemispheres of the brain are responsible for different modes of thought and action.
The split-brain hypothesis and Jaynes' (1976) bicameral brain theory are also relegated to the religious experience chapter rather than the biology chapter, and there is more biological material included in the mental health chapter.
Studies with split-brain patients also have supported the hemispheric differences discussed in the previous section.
The MSCS architecture handles this issue using a single quorum resource in the cluster that is used as the tie-breaker to avoid split-brain scenarios.
In this talk I will briefly describe several studies with adults, children, and colostomy ("split-brain" patients) that investigated the properties of gaze-triggered orienting and explored its relationship to traditional reflexive and voluntary orienting, as well as to face processing.
She follows this with a brief history of split-brain theory and its relationship to integration, noting that some people are right- or left-brain dominant, while others are able to integrate those features.
And, similar to the feelings Slater reports when her medication begins to make her well in Prozac Diary, there is both victory and defeat in the cessation of her seizures after she has a corpus callostomy, or "split-brain" surgery, just before her freshman year of college.
Michael Gazzaniga, a prolific author who worked with Roger Sperry on the well-publicized research on split-brain patients, also objects to the idea that certain experiences automatically improve children's brains.
The split-brain person functionally has two brains, a left and a right.