splinter haemorrhage

splinter haemorrhage

A small, linear subungual haemorrhage, which is red when fresh and brown when aged, located at the distal 1/3 of the nailbed and classically associated with mitral stenosis.
 
Pathogenesis
The blood “leaks” into the avascular squames under the fingernails due to microemboli and/or increased capillary fragility. While splinter haemorrhages (SHs) are characteristic of acute and subacute bacterial endocarditis, they are more commonly due to trauma, occurring in up to 10% of normal subjects and in 40% of patients with mitral stenosis; SHs also occur in the retina in papilledema, due to retinal vein occlusion, subarachnoid haemorrhage or, rarely, trichinosis.

splinter haemorrhage

minute, linear, subungual haemorrhage; extends from free margin into nail bed; characteristic of mild nail trauma, following exposure to low oxygen tension (e.g. mountain air) or, more rarely, endocarditis
References in periodicals archive ?
d/ There is a splinter haemorrhage on the superotemporal rim
We found a statistically significant relationship between the mean age of the patients and solar elastosis, splinter haemorrhage and longitudinal ridging.
I also spotted two small splinter haemorrhages near his optic nerve at the back of his eye.
These are splinter haemorrhages, a sign of a heart infection.
Some are minor, such as white spots and splinter haemorrhages caused by damage to the nail base or bed.