splenosis

sple·no·sis

(splē-nō'sis),
Implantation and subsequent growth of splenic tissue within the abdomen as a result of disruption of the spleen.

splenosis

The autotransplantation of splenic tissue to atypical sites after open splenic trauma–eg, MVAs, gunshot, or stab wounds; splenic pulp implants appear as red-blue nodules on the peritoneum, omentum, and mesentery, which are morphologically similar to multifocal pelvic endometriosis. Cf Hypersplenism.

sple·no·sis

(splē-nō'sis)
Implantation and subsequent growth of splenic tissue within the abdomen as a result of disruption of the spleen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Splenosis is a frequent consequence/complication of traumatic splenic rupture because of the "transplantation" of splenic tissue through local mechanical seeding or hematogenous dissemination.
Ferrant et al., "Inadequate detection of accessory spleens and splenosis with laparoscopic splenectomy A shortcoming of the laparoscopic approach in hematologic diseases," Surgical Endoscopy, vol.
Thoracic splenosis diagnosed 48 years after thoracoabdominal trauma.
Beside Paget disease, various other tumors [11], coeliac ganglia [12], splenosis [13], sarcoidosis [14], and subacute stroke [15] have been reported to cause false-positive PSMA-PET imaging findings.
Also, leftsided pleural nodules with a history of prior trauma may reflect splenosis while empyemas occasionally involve the mediastinal pleura.
Accessory spleen needs to be distinguished from splenosis which is an acquired condition associated with splenic trauma or surgery having incidence of 67% in these patients (11).
Possible diagnoses are; endometriosis and splenosis. The appearance is not consistent with malignant nodules.
Splenosis develops when splenic tissue is seeded within the abdomen or pelvis (Figure 4) following trauma 12].
Splenosis is an acquired anomaly of the spleen which occurs in case of splenic trauma or splenectomy.
Ectopic splenic tissue can manifest in two distinct forms: splenosis and accessory spleens.
Splenosis is the presence of splenic tissue at various ectopic sites, usually the peritoneum, omentum, mesen tery, or pelvis, in relation to previous trauma.