spittle

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sa·li·va

(să-lī'vă),
A clear, tasteless, odorless, slightly acidic (pH 6.8) viscid fluid, consisting of the secretion from the parotid, sublingual, and submandibular salivary glands and the mucous glands of the oral cavity; its function is to keep the mucous membrane of the mouth moist, to lubricate food during mastication, and, in a measure, to convert starch into maltose, the latter action being effected by a diastatic enzyme, ptyalin.
Synonym(s): spittle
[L. akin to G. sialon]

sa·li·va

(să-lī'vă)
A clear, tasteless, odorless, slightly acid (pH 6.8) viscid fluid, consisting of the secretions from the parotid, sublingual, and submandibular salivary glands and the mucous glands of the oral cavity; its function is to keep the mucous membrane of the mouth moist, to lubricate food during mastication, and to convert starch into maltose.
Synonym(s): spittle.
[L. akin to G. sialon]
References in periodicals archive ?
In Africa and Madagascar, larvae of the genus Leucophenga occupy spittle masses of Ptyelus grossus Fabricius, P.
larvae sometimes irritate Clastoptera globosa Fowler nymphs, causing them to leave their spittle masses and expose themselves to potential predation.
There are also unresolved questions concerning Cladochaeta host range and the extent to which Cladochaeta larvae depend on the spittle microhabitat with or without parasitic interactions.
In both cases, pupation within the spittle mass was the rule and pupae were typically found in or adjacent to spittle masses.
In contrast to Cladochaeta inversa, this unidentified Cladochaeta species regularly pupated outside of spittle masses and suffered heavy pupal parasitism from hymenopterous parasites.
Apparently, flies are attracted to the spittlebug nymphs or a nymphal by-product in the spittle, and not to the xylem fluid derived from particular host plants.
Bigger hosts do not seem to produce bigger flies (Table 3), and bigger size could, in any case, be attributed to greater spittle food resources associated with larger spittlebug hosts.
It is possible, for example, that larvae living in the relatively uncrowded conditions we encountered (no more than one maggot per nymph on average, Table 2) have ample spittle food resources (presumably micro-organisms) and are rarely pressed to resort to parasitism, whereas larvae at higher densities might often resort to parasitism to obtain sufficient nutrients.
infestations on Clastoptera globosa in Mexico, and Tsacas and Couturier (1993) report approximately equal numbers of Cladochaeta ptyelophila larvae and Cephisus erythrocephalus nymphs in aggregated spittle masses with 100 or more nymphs in Ecuador.
This would require a tracer that could not be passed along in the spittle itself.