spirometry


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Related to spirometry: incentive spirometry

spirometry

 [spi-rom´ĕ-tre]
measurement of the breathing capacity by means of a spirometer; results can record total lung capacity, vital capacity, tidal volume, functional residual capacity, and residual volume.
incentive spirometry a goal-oriented inhalation maneuver in which the patient is encouraged by visual feedback from a spirometer to execute sustained maximal inhalation. Patients usually perform 10 to 20 sustained deep breath exercises an hour until they can achieve their predicted inspiratory reserve volume. See illustration.
Spirometry, showing respiratory volumes and capacities as subdivisions of total lung capacity. From Applegate, 2000.

spi·rom·e·try

(spī-rom'ĕ-trē),
Making pulmonary measurements with a spirometer.

spirometry

/spi·rom·e·try/ (spi-rom´ĕ-tre) the measurement of the breathing capacity of the lungs, such as in pulmonary function tests. See also spirography. spiromet´ric

spirometry

[spīrom′ətrē]
laboratory evaluation of the air capacity of the lungs by means of a spirometer. Compare blood gas determination. spirometric, adj.

spirometry

The measurement of the movement of air in and out of the lungs during various breathing maneuvers, which is the most important pulmonary function test. See Incentive spirometry, Pulmonary function test.

spi·rom·e·try

(spī-rom'ĕ-trē)
Making pulmonary measurements with a spirometer.

spirometry

(spi-rom'e-tre) [L. spirare, to breathe, + Gr. metron, measure]
Measurement of air flow and lung volumes. See: pulmonary function test
Enlarge picture
INCENTIVE SPIROMETER

incentive spirometry

Spirometry in which visual and vocal stimuli are given to the patient to produce maximum effort during deep breathing. Incentive spirometry is used most often in postoperative patients to prevent atelectasis.
See: illustration

spirometry

A lung function test used to determine the efficiency with which air passes from the atmosphere to the ALVEOLI of the lungs and carbon dioxide passes out. Spirometry can also be used to assess the maximum volume of air that can be made to pass in and out of the lungs (the vital capacity).

Spirometry

A test using an instrument called a spirometer that shows how difficult it is for an asthmatic patient to breathe. Used to determine the severity of asthma and to see how well it is responding to treatment.
Mentioned in: Asthma

spi·rom·e·try

(spī-rom'ĕ-trē)
Making pulmonary measurements with a spirometer.

spirometry (spīrom´ətrē),

n laboratory evaluation of the air capacity of the lungs by means of a spirometer.

spirometry

measurement of the breathing capacity by means of a spirometer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table-2: Baseline and predicted spirometry values in case and control groups.
The change "allows you to plan treatment based on symptoms [even] if you don't have immediate access to spirometry, and then refine treatment once you have spirometry results.
Conclusion: Pre-operative incentive spirometry helps to reduce and prevent postoperative atelectasis in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.
The Incentive spirometry has been widely used in clinical practice, especially in the management of patients in the pre and post-operative stay of major surgeries, because of its low cost, easy availability and good compliance of patients to the method9,10.
The results of spirometry done on the 40 subjects and 40 controls were compared.
At the primary care or initial evaluation, the minimum required tests should include at least baseline spirometry, bronchodilator response, and a chest radiograph.
Workplace spirometry monitoring for respiratory disease prevention: a methods review.
The data was collected from 1989-1994 and complied with the 1987 ATS recommendations for spirometry (both equipment and testing procedures).
Objective measures of pulmonary function can be obtained by using a peak flow meter, but spirometry testing is considered a more reliable and valid measurement of respiratory function and asthma severity.
Spirometry forms an important component in the diagnosis and management of pulmonary diseases in children and can be reliably performed in children as young as 2-4 years of age if adequately prepared.
A team of seven students, guided by their clinical faculty, carried out blood pressure, glucose and spirometry (measuring of breath) tests for the elderly population of the villages.