spirometry


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Related to spirometry: incentive spirometry

spirometry

 [spi-rom´ĕ-tre]
measurement of the breathing capacity by means of a spirometer; results can record total lung capacity, vital capacity, tidal volume, functional residual capacity, and residual volume.
incentive spirometry a goal-oriented inhalation maneuver in which the patient is encouraged by visual feedback from a spirometer to execute sustained maximal inhalation. Patients usually perform 10 to 20 sustained deep breath exercises an hour until they can achieve their predicted inspiratory reserve volume. See illustration.
Spirometry, showing respiratory volumes and capacities as subdivisions of total lung capacity. From Applegate, 2000.

spi·rom·e·try

(spī-rom'ĕ-trē),
Making pulmonary measurements with a spirometer.

spirometry

The measurement of the movement of air in and out of the lungs during various breathing maneuvers, which is the most important pulmonary function test. See Incentive spirometry, Pulmonary function test.

spi·rom·e·try

(spī-rom'ĕ-trē)
Making pulmonary measurements with a spirometer.

spirometry

(spi-rom'e-tre) [L. spirare, to breathe, + Gr. metron, measure]
Measurement of air flow and lung volumes. See: pulmonary function test
Enlarge picture
INCENTIVE SPIROMETER

incentive spirometry

Spirometry in which visual and vocal stimuli are given to the patient to produce maximum effort during deep breathing. Incentive spirometry is used most often in postoperative patients to prevent atelectasis.
See: illustration

spirometry

A lung function test used to determine the efficiency with which air passes from the atmosphere to the ALVEOLI of the lungs and carbon dioxide passes out. Spirometry can also be used to assess the maximum volume of air that can be made to pass in and out of the lungs (the vital capacity).

Spirometry

A test using an instrument called a spirometer that shows how difficult it is for an asthmatic patient to breathe. Used to determine the severity of asthma and to see how well it is responding to treatment.
Mentioned in: Asthma

spi·rom·e·try

(spī-rom'ĕ-trē)
Making pulmonary measurements with a spirometer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mobile phone-linked spirometry technology has been designed specifically for evaluating lung function at primary care level, allowing patients access to potential diagnosis, monitoring and treatment in ways that are currently not available in these settings.
Patients again underwent spirometry postoperatively 1 month after surgery.
Keywords: Pulmonary function test, Spirometry, Forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume, Regression analysis.
According to Meilan Han, MD, MS, a member of the GOLD Science Committee, since release of the 2017 guidelines, "clinicians have indicated that they like the flexibility the system provides in separating spirometry, symptoms, and exacerbation risk, as this more accurately reflects the heterogeneity we see in the COPD patient population." Nevertheless, how this approach influences long-term outcomes remains unclear.
KEYWORDS: Determinants of spirometry, Spirometry reference ranges, Spirometry reference equation, Spirometry in Asian children, Spirometry reference values in children/ adolescents.
To reassess the pulmonary function by spirometry in those patients after three months of normalisation of their TSH levels by levothyroxine treatment.
Two thousands four hundered and forty five (52.32%) had obstructive, (22.49%) restrictive, (12.9%) with mixed pattern and (4.3%) had normal spirometry. In obstructive patients bronchial asthma were (35.13%), COPD 741(30.3%) asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) (9.48%), acute bronchitis (05.64%), bronchiectasis 173(7.07%) and unclear diagnosis (04.17%).
Data was collected in the school site and the following individuals were selected: healthy non-athletes (children not enrolled in high-performance sports federations), non-obese children (body mass index above 25 kg/[m.sup.2]) and non-undernourished (mass index lower than 18.5kg/[m.sup.2]) [10], children with no diagnosis or history of cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal, rheumatic, neurological diseases, auditory or visual deficits, and children with normal spirometry parameters.
Joseph Carter, head of British Lung Foundation (BLF) Wales, said: "This is why we would like all health boards to invest more in diagnostic equipment - such as spirometry.
Joseph Carter, head of British Lung Foundation Wales, said: "This is why we would like all health boards to invest more in diagnostic equipment - such as spirometry.
Spirometry now stands apart from GOLD's ABCD symptom/exacerbation risk score with its own grade, with possibilities ranging from 1 to 4.