spirometra mansoni

Spi·ro·me·tra man·so·ni

a species of pseudophyllid tapeworms of wild and feral cats, the larval form of which (sparganum) may survive in human tissues; it has been commonly found in humans in the Far East, but is also reported from widely scattered areas elsewhere; infection of humans with the sparganum occurs from active migration of the larva from freshly split infected frogs used as a poultice for wounds, sore eyes (as in ocular sparganosis), bruises, or ulcerations; it is also likely that humans may be infected with sparganum larvae from eating any vertebrate harboring these plerocercoids.

spirometra mansoni

An elongated plerocercoid species, 3 to 14 in. (7.6 to 35 cm) in length, found in muscles and connective tissue, esp. that around the eye; common in the Far East.
See also: spirometra
References in periodicals archive ?
IgG to other parasites including Paragonimus westermani , Paragonimiasis sichuanensis , Schistosoma japonicum , and Spirometra mansoni were all negative.
Serodiagnosis of experimental Sparganum infections of mice and human sparganosis by ELISA using ES antigens of Spirometra mansoni spargana.
showed this dot immunogold filtration assay for sparganosis mansoni has light cross-reactivity to clonorchiasis (8%) and serious cross-reactivity to paragonimiasis (52%).[6] Although Spirometra mansoni spargana could parasitize in many different human tissues, the parasitizing in lung is infrequent.[7] What's most important is that sparganosis mansoni is usually caused by the ingestion of raw meat of frogs or snakes.[7]