spirometer


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spirometer

 [spi-rom´ĕ-ter]
an instrument for measuring air inhaled into and exhaled out of the lungs; it provides a simple way of determining most of the lung volumes and capacities that are measured in pulmonary function tests. One type is the water-seal spirometer, which consists of a hollow drum floating over a chamber of water and counterbalanced by weights so that it can move freely up and down. Inside the drum is a mixture of gases, usually oxygen and air. Leading from the hollow space in the drum to the outside is a tube that has a mouthpiece through which the patient breathes. As one inhales and exhales through the tube the drum rises and falls, causing a needle to move on a nearby rotating chart. The tracing recorded on the chart is called a spirogram.
Using a flow spirometer. From Lammon et al., 1995.

spi·rom·e·ter

(spī-rom'ĕ-tĕr),
In clinical practice and research, any device used for measuring flows and volumes, inspired and expired by the lungs, thus assessing pulmonary function. Considered the most basic measurement device of pulmonary function.
[L. spiro, to breathe, + G. metron, measure]

spirometer

(spī-rŏm′ĭ-tər)
n.
An instrument for measuring the volume of air entering and leaving the lungs.

spi′ro·met′ric (-rə-mĕt′rĭk) adj.
spi·rom′e·try n.

spi·rom·e·ter

(spī-rom'ĕ-tĕr)
A gasometer used for measuring respiratory gases; usually understood to consist of a counterbalanced cylindric bell sealed by dipping into a circular trough of water.
[L. spiro, to breathe, + G. metron, measure]

spirometer

an instrument for measuring the volume of respired air.

Spirometer

An instrument that is used to test lung capacity. It is used to screen patients with dyspnea.

spi·rom·e·ter

(spī-rom'ĕ-tĕr)
In clinical practice and research, any device used for measuring flows and volumes.
[L. spiro, to breathe, + G. metron, measure]
References in periodicals archive ?
We defined obstructive lung disease as an [FEV.sub.1]/FVC ratio <0.7 as measured by desktop spirometry in order to calculate the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of the Air-Smart Spirometer.
The report covers the present scenario and the growth prospects of the global spirometer market for 2016-2020.
Between subjects, volume-based spirometers used with a closed-circuit technique should be flushed with room air at least 5 times over the spirometer's entire volume range to ensure clearance of droplet nuclei.
Independent patients received an incentive spirometer (Voldyne[R] 5000 Volumetric Exeroser, Hudson RCI [Research Triangle Park, NC]) and an oral care packet of toothbrush and toothpaste.
A surprising result was that even though subjects used the spirometer during game play and the control period, their ability to take a deep breath (termed vital capacity) improved significantly only after game play.
One group got physical therapy with a spirometer before surgery to strengthen muscles used in breathing.
The airway function of the patients was assessed using a method called "forced expiration volume in 1 second" (FEV1) by means of an instrument called a spirometer.
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A spirometer can measure the volume of expired air before and after exertion.
has announced that its Brentwood [R] by Midmark [R] product division has received clearance from the FDA to market its IQmark [TM] Digital Spirometer. This PC-based diagnostic spirometer allows doctors to evaluate and monitor their patients' pulmonary function and to transfer the information directly into electronic medical records.
The patient breathes through a mouthpiece into a machine (spirometer) that measures the volume of air in the lungs, the movement of air into and out of the lungs, and the movement of oxygen from the lungs into the blood.