ether

(redirected from spiritus ether nit)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

ether

 [e´ther]
1. an organic compound containing an oxygen atom bonded to two carbon atoms.
2. diethyl or ethyl ether: a colorless, transparent, mobile, very volatile, highly flammable liquid with a characteristic odor; it was the first inhalational anesthetic used for surgical anesthesia, but is now rarely used in the United States or Canada because of its flammability.

e·ther

(ē'thĕr),
1. Any organic compound in which two carbon atoms are independently linked to a common oxygen atom, thus containing the group -C-O-C-.
See also: epoxy.
2. Loosely used to refer to diethyl ether or an anesthetic ether, although a large number of ethers have anesthetic properties. For individual ethers, see the specific name.
[G. aithēr, the pure upper air]

ether

(ē′thər)
n.
1. Any of a class of organic compounds in which two hydrocarbon groups are linked by an oxygen atom.
2. A volatile, highly flammable liquid, C4H10O, derived from distilling ethyl alcohol with sulfuric acid, used as a reagent and solvent, and formerly used as an anesthetic. Also called diethyl ether, ethyl ether.
3. The regions of space beyond the earth's atmosphere; the heavens.
4. The element believed in ancient and medieval civilizations to fill all space above the sphere of the moon and to compose the stars and planets.
5. Physics An all-pervading, infinitely elastic, massless medium formerly postulated as the medium of propagation of electromagnetic waves.

e·ther′ic (ĭ-thĕr′ĭk, ĭ-thîr′-) adj.

e·ther

(ē'thĕr)
1. Any organic compound in which two carbon atoms are independently linked to a common oxygen atom, thus containing the group -C-O-C-.
See also: epoxy
2. Loosely used to refer to diethyl ether.
[G. aithēr, the pure upper air]

ether

A volatile and highly inflammable liquid once widely used as a safe and effective drug for the induction and continuance of general anaesthesia. Induction is slow and unpleasant and deep anaesthesia is needed for muscle relaxation. Postoperative nausea is common. Because of these disadvantages and the danger of explosion, ether is now seldom used. The drug is, however, on the WHO official list.

e·ther

(ē'thĕr)
Any organic compound in which two carbon atoms are independently linked to a common oxygen atom, but commonly used to refer to diethyl ether or an anesthetic ether, although a large number of ethers have anesthetic properties.
[G. aithēr, the pure upper air]