spinal fusion

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Related to spine fusion: cervical spine fusion

fusion

 [fu´zhun]
1. the act or process of melting.
2. the merging or coherence of adjacent parts or bodies.
3. the coordination of separate images of the same object in the two eyes into one.
4. the operative formation of an ankylosis or arthrosis.
diaphyseal-epiphyseal fusion operative establishment of bony union between the epiphysis and diaphysis of a bone.
spinal fusion surgical creation of ankylosis between contiguous vertebrae; used in treatment of spondylosis and ruptured intervertebral disk. Called also spondylosyndesis.

spi·nal fu·sion

, spine fusion
an operative procedure to accomplish bony ankylosis between two or more vertebrae.

spinal fusion

the fixation of an unstable segment of the spine, accomplished sometimes by skeletal traction or immobilization of the patient in a body cast but most frequently by a surgical procedure. Operative ankylosis may be performed in the treatment of spinal fractures or after diskectomy or laminectomy for the correction of a herniated vertebral disk. Surgical fusion involves the stabilization of a spinal section with a bone graft or synthetic device introduced through a posterior incision in the lumbar region; in the less frequently fused cervical region the incision may be anterior or posterior. Also called spondylosyndesis.

spinal fusion

Spondylosyndesis Orthopedics A procedure in which multiple vertebrae are operatively fused, usually with diskectomy or laminectomy; while SF ↑ spinal stability, virtually eliminates pain, ROM is lost

spi·nal fu·sion

, spine fusion (spī'năl fyū'zhŭn, spīn)
A surgical procedure to accomplish bony ankylosis between two or more vertebrae.
Synonym(s): spondylosyndesis.

spinal fusion

A surgical procedure to effect permanent healing between the bodies of two or more adjacent VERTEBRAE. This is done to avoid dangerous movement between vertebrae arising from bone disease of various kinds.

Spinal fusion

An operation in which the bones of the lower spine are permanently joined together using a bone graft obtained usually from the hip.

fusion

1. the act or process of melting.
2. the merging or coherence of adjacent parts or bodies.
3. the operative formation of an ankylosis or arthrosis.

diaphyseal-epiphyseal fusion
operative establishment of bony union between the epiphysis and diaphysis of a bone.
nerve fusion
nerve anastomosis done to induce regeneration for resupplying empty tracts of a nerve with new growth of fibers.
nuclear fusion
the fusion of two atomic nuclei to form a single heavier nucleus, resulting in the release of enormous amounts of energy.
spinal fusion
surgical creation of ankylosis between contiguous vertebrae; spondylosyndesis.

spinal

pertaining to a spine or to the vertebral column and in many instances to the spinal cord.

spinal abscess
infection may be introduced hematologically from navel infection to a vertebral body or up the vertebral canal from an infected docking wound. Clinically there is a development of paresis over a few days then paraplegia when the abscess is in the lumbar region or quadriplegia when it is located in the cervical area.
spinal accessory nerve
see accessory nerve, Table 14.
congenital spinal stenosis
stenosis of the vertebral canal present at birth; recorded in calves.
spinal fibrocartilaginous emboli
see fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy.
focal symmetrical spinal poliomalacia
see focal symmetrical spinal poliomalacia.
spinal fusion
surgical creation of ankylosis of contiguous vertebrae.
spinal meninges
spinal meningitis
usually part of cerebrospinal meningitis. May be local related to spinal cord abscess and cause localized pain and muscle rigidity.
spinal muscular atrophy
see hereditary spinal muscular atrophy, hereditary neuronal abiotrophy of Swedish Lapland dogs.
spinal myelitis
spinal myelopathy
spinal nerve
any of the paired nerves arising from the spinal cord and passing out between the vertebrae.
spinal puncture
introduction of a hollow needle into the subarachnoid space of the spinal canal, usually for the purpose of collecting a sample of cerebrospinal fluid, to introduce radiopaque material for myelography, or the injection of an anesthetic.
spinal reflex
any reflex action mediated through a center at the spinal cord.
spinal stenosis
see spinal cord compression (above).
spinal tap
see spinal puncture (above).
spinal trauma
temporary or permanent dislocation of one or more spinal vertebrae; or fracture; causes immediate flaccid paralysis caudal to injury due to spinal shock, followed by residual signs due to damage to spinal cord tissue.
spinal walking
see reflex walking.
References in periodicals archive ?
Notwithstanding the lack of explicit literature on the management of anesthesia in patients with special characteristics (such as our patient), undergoing lumbar spine fusion, we argue that such predisposition to bleed should be approached similarly to the group of patients receiving anticoagulation or platelet anti aggregation.
sup][13] retrospectively reviewed patients undergoing posterior spine fusion with allograft and found that the complication rates and an average loss of correction were favorably less compared with ICBG.
Various shapes of plates in different sizes have been developed for anterior or posterior spine fusion.
Last Easter he was admitted to hospital when there were complications with an earlier spine fusion and he suffered a massive infection.
6) Finally, segments of cortical bone can be machined into dowels for use in spine fusion and other applications.
Specific essays consider low back pain illness, spine fusion, allografts, gene therapy, disc biology and degeneration, spinal cord repair, image- guided and electromagnetic navigation, and intraoperative use of the CT scan.
Abstract: The estimated cumulative cost of health care attributable to back pain exceeds $25 billion per year in the United States, and more than 200,000 spine fusion procedures are performed each year in an effort to relieve discogenic back pain and instability.
Aastrom's TRC cell products are in clinical trials for the following therapeutic indications: severe bone fractures (US: Phase I/II - multi-center; EU: Phase I/II - multi-center), ischemic vascular disease (EU: Phase I/II), jaw reconstruction (EU: proof of concept trial), and spine fusion (US: Phase I/II - single-center).
Is intensive rehabilitation as effective as lumbar spine fusion to improve function in patients with chronic low back pain?
Airmen who undergo spine fusion are limited in activity and normally do not return to functional duty for at least three months.
The postoperative incidence of dysphagia following an anterior-approach cervical spine fusion has been reported to be 50.