gelatinous substance

(redirected from spinal lamina II)

ge·lat·i·nous sub·stance

[TA]
the apical part of the posterior horn (dorsal horn; posterior gray column) of the spinal cord's gray matter, composed largely of very small nerve cells; its gelatinous appearance is due to its very low content of myelinated nerve fibers; spinal lamina II (of Rexed).

ge·lat·i·nous sub·stance

(jĕ-lat'i-nŭs sub'stăns) [TA]
The apical part of the posterior horn (dorsal horn; posterior gray column) of the gray matter of the spinal cord, composed largely of very small nerve cells; its gelatinous appearance is due to its very low content of myelinated nerve fibers.

Rolando,

Luigi, Italian anatomist, 1773-1831.
fissure of Rolando - a double S-shaped fissure extending obliquely upward and backward on the lateral surface of each cerebral hemisphere at the boundary between frontal and parietal lobes. Synonym(s): central sulcus
rolandic epilepsy - a benign autosomal dominant form of epilepsy occurring in children.
Rolando angle - the angle at which the fissure of Rolando meets with the midplane.
Rolando area - the region of the cerebral cortex most immediately influencing movements of the face, neck and trunk, arm, and leg. Synonym(s): motor cortex
Rolando cells - the nerve cells in Rolando gelatinous substance of the spinal cord.
Rolando column - a slight ridge on either side of the medulla oblongata related to the descending trigeminal tract and nucleus.
Rolando gelatinous substance - the apical part of the posterior horn of the spinal cord's gray matter, composed largely of very small nerve cells. Synonym(s): gelatinous substance
Rolando tubercle - a longitudinal prominence on the dorsolateral surface of the medulla oblongata along the lateral border of the tuberculum cuneatum. Synonym(s): tuberculum cinereum