spinal fusion


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fusion

 [fu´zhun]
1. the act or process of melting.
2. the merging or coherence of adjacent parts or bodies.
3. the coordination of separate images of the same object in the two eyes into one.
4. the operative formation of an ankylosis or arthrosis.
diaphyseal-epiphyseal fusion operative establishment of bony union between the epiphysis and diaphysis of a bone.
spinal fusion surgical creation of ankylosis between contiguous vertebrae; used in treatment of spondylosis and ruptured intervertebral disk. Called also spondylosyndesis.

spi·nal fu·sion

, spine fusion
an operative procedure to accomplish bony ankylosis between two or more vertebrae.

spinal fusion

the fixation of an unstable segment of the spine, accomplished sometimes by skeletal traction or immobilization of the patient in a body cast but most frequently by a surgical procedure. Operative ankylosis may be performed in the treatment of spinal fractures or after diskectomy or laminectomy for the correction of a herniated vertebral disk. Surgical fusion involves the stabilization of a spinal section with a bone graft or synthetic device introduced through a posterior incision in the lumbar region; in the less frequently fused cervical region the incision may be anterior or posterior. Also called spondylosyndesis.

spinal fusion

Spondylosyndesis Orthopedics A procedure in which multiple vertebrae are operatively fused, usually with diskectomy or laminectomy; while SF ↑ spinal stability, virtually eliminates pain, ROM is lost

spi·nal fu·sion

, spine fusion (spī'năl fyū'zhŭn, spīn)
A surgical procedure to accomplish bony ankylosis between two or more vertebrae.
Synonym(s): spondylosyndesis.

spinal fusion

A surgical procedure to effect permanent healing between the bodies of two or more adjacent VERTEBRAE. This is done to avoid dangerous movement between vertebrae arising from bone disease of various kinds.

Spinal fusion

An operation in which the bones of the lower spine are permanently joined together using a bone graft obtained usually from the hip.

fusion

1. the act or process of melting.
2. the merging or coherence of adjacent parts or bodies.
3. the operative formation of an ankylosis or arthrosis.

diaphyseal-epiphyseal fusion
operative establishment of bony union between the epiphysis and diaphysis of a bone.
nerve fusion
nerve anastomosis done to induce regeneration for resupplying empty tracts of a nerve with new growth of fibers.
nuclear fusion
the fusion of two atomic nuclei to form a single heavier nucleus, resulting in the release of enormous amounts of energy.
spinal fusion
surgical creation of ankylosis between contiguous vertebrae; spondylosyndesis.

spinal

pertaining to a spine or to the vertebral column and in many instances to the spinal cord.

spinal abscess
infection may be introduced hematologically from navel infection to a vertebral body or up the vertebral canal from an infected docking wound. Clinically there is a development of paresis over a few days then paraplegia when the abscess is in the lumbar region or quadriplegia when it is located in the cervical area.
spinal accessory nerve
see accessory nerve, Table 14.
congenital spinal stenosis
stenosis of the vertebral canal present at birth; recorded in calves.
spinal fibrocartilaginous emboli
see fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy.
focal symmetrical spinal poliomalacia
see focal symmetrical spinal poliomalacia.
spinal fusion
surgical creation of ankylosis of contiguous vertebrae.
spinal meninges
spinal meningitis
usually part of cerebrospinal meningitis. May be local related to spinal cord abscess and cause localized pain and muscle rigidity.
spinal muscular atrophy
see hereditary spinal muscular atrophy, hereditary neuronal abiotrophy of Swedish Lapland dogs.
spinal myelitis
spinal myelopathy
spinal nerve
any of the paired nerves arising from the spinal cord and passing out between the vertebrae.
spinal puncture
introduction of a hollow needle into the subarachnoid space of the spinal canal, usually for the purpose of collecting a sample of cerebrospinal fluid, to introduce radiopaque material for myelography, or the injection of an anesthetic.
spinal reflex
any reflex action mediated through a center at the spinal cord.
spinal stenosis
see spinal cord compression (above).
spinal tap
see spinal puncture (above).
spinal trauma
temporary or permanent dislocation of one or more spinal vertebrae; or fracture; causes immediate flaccid paralysis caudal to injury due to spinal shock, followed by residual signs due to damage to spinal cord tissue.
spinal walking
see reflex walking.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the major factors subsidizing the growth of China spinal fusion market are increasing rate of aging population with spine related diseases & related injuries coupled with the rising incomes of the Chinese populace ensuring the patients' capability to pay for the treatment.
GlobalData analysts believe that such measures will tamper with the spinal fusion procedural growth rate and subsequently impact the overall market valuation over the coming years.
Adequate spinal fusion fails to occur in 8 to 35 percent or more of patients, and persistent pain occurs in up to 60 percent of patients with fusion failure, which often necessitates additional surgery.
Two comparisons of lumbar-disk replacement with spinal fusion also had a similar design.
Orthobone also ensures that RHAKOSS has a similar radiolucency to natural bone, allowing surgeons to readily assess the success of the cervical spinal fusion procedure.
Over 500,000 spinal fusion operations are performed each year worldwide to relieve severe back pain and other spinal disorders.
US-based biotechnology company Burst Biologics has received IRB approval to begin a multicentre prospective clinical study in spinal fusion patients, the company said.
that will provide surgeons and hospitals in Europe with access to Amedica's interbody spinal fusion devices made with silicon nitride.
On the other hand, for patients with spinal stenosis with associated slipped vertebrae, the benefits of spinal fusion surgery may not be enough to offset costs.
Spinal fusion surgery is undoubtedly effective for some conditions, such as fractures, spinal tumors, and spondylolisthesis.
Spine surgeons should guard against the overuse of spinal fusion surgery and should do a better job of patient selection.