spinal cord

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cord

 [kord]
any long, cylindrical, flexible structure; called also chord, chorda, and funiculus.
spermatic cord the structure extending from the abdominal inguinal ring to the testis, comprising the pampiniform plexus, nerves, ductus deferens, testicular artery, and other vessels.
spinal cord see spinal cord.
tethered cord a congenital anomaly resulting from defective closure of the neural tube; the conus medullaris is abnormally low and tethered by a short, thickened filum terminale, fibrous bands, intradural lipoma, or some other intradural abnormality. Surgical correction in infancy or early childhood is necessary to prevent progressive neurological deficit in the lower limb and bladder dysfunction.
umbilical cord see umbilical cord.
vocal c's see vocal cords.

spinal

 [spi´nal]
1. pertaining to a spine.
2. pertaining to the vertebral column.
spinal cord that part of the central nervous system lodged in the spinal canal, extending from the foramen magnum to the upper part of the lumbar region. It is composed of an inner core of gray substance in which nerve cells predominate and an outer layer of white substance in which myelinated nerve fibers predominate. Called also medulla spinalis. (See Plates and see accompanying figures.)
Gross anatomy of the spinal cord. From Applegate, 2000.
Cross section of the spinal cord. From Applegate, 2000.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

spi·nal cord

[TA]
the elongated cylindric portion of the cerebrospinal axis, or central nervous system, which is contained in the spinal or vertebral canal.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

spinal cord

n.
The thick, whitish cord of nerve tissue that extends from the medulla oblongata down through the spinal column and from which the spinal nerves branch off to various parts of the body.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

spi·nal cord

(spī'năl kōrd) [TA]
The elongated cylindric portion of the cerebrospinal axis, or central nervous system, which is contained in the spinal or vertebral canal.
Synonym(s): medulla spinalis.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

spinal cord

Enlarge picture
SPINAL CORD: Cross-section with nerve roots on left side and examples of tracts on right side
Part of the central nervous system, the spinal cord is an ovoid column of nerve tissue 40 to 50 cm long that extends from the medulla to the second lumbar vertebra; it is within the spinal (vertebral) canal, protected by bone, and directly enclosed in the meninges. The center of the cord is gray matter in the shape of the letter H; it consists of the cell bodies and dendrites of neurons. The ventral (anterior) horns of the gray matter contain cell bodies of somatic motor neurons; the dorsal (posterior) horns contain cell bodies of interneurons. The white matter is arranged in tracts around the gray matter. It consists of myelinated axons that transmit impulses to and from the brain, or between levels of gray matter in the spinal cord, or that will leave the cord as part of peripheral nerves. The spinal cord is the pathway for sensory impulses to the brain and motor impulses from the brain; it also mediates stretch reflexes and the defecation and urination reflexes. Thirty-one pairs of spinal nerves emerge from the spinal cord and innervate the trunk and limbs. See: illustration
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

spinal cord

The downward continuation of the BRAINSTEM that lies within a canal in the spine (VERTEBRAL COLUMN). The cord is a cylinder of nerve tissue about 45 cm long containing bundles of nerve fibre tracts running up and down, to and from the brain. These tracts form SYNAPSES with the 62 spinal nerves that emerge in pairs from either side of the cord, between adjacent vertebrae, and carry nerve impulses to and from all parts of the trunk and the limbs.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

spinal cord

a cable-like nervous structure in vertebrates, enclosed in the backbone and extending the full length of the body behind the head. Pairs of spinal nerves leave the cord in each segment of the body The cord forms part of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM and contains many NERVE CELLS and bundles of fibres, many associated with simple REFLEX ARCS, others with the brain. Coordination of movement of various parts of the body is brought about in the spinal cord.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Spinal cord

Elongated nerve bundles that lie in the vertebral canal and from which the spinal nerves emerge.
Mentioned in: Coccyx Injuries
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

spi·nal cord

(spī'năl kōrd) [TA]
The elongated cylindric portion of the cerebrospinal axis, or central nervous system, which is contained in the spinal or vertebral canal.
Synonym(s): medulla spinalis.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
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