longitudinal relaxation

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lon·gi·tu·di·nal re·lax·a·tion

in nuclear magnetic resonance, the return of the magnetic dipoles of the hydrogen nuclei (magnetization vector) to equilibrium parallel to the magnetic field, after they have been flipped 90°; varies in rate in different tissues, taking up to 15 s for water. See: TI.

longitudinal relaxation

An MRI term for the return of longitudinal magnetisation to equilibrium after excitation due to an exchange of energy between the nuclear spins and the lattice.

lon·gi·tu·di·nal re·lax·a·tion

(long'ji-tū'di-năl rē'lak-sā'shŭn)
magnetic resonance imaging The return of the magnetic dipoles of the hydrogen nuclei (magnetization vector) to equilibrium parallel to the magnetic field, after they have been flipped 90°; varies in rate in different tissues, taking up to 15 seconds for water.
See: TI
References in periodicals archive ?
Hydrogen spin-lattice relaxation times were determined directly by the traditional inversion recovery pulse sequence (180[degrees] - [tau] - 90[degrees]); the instrument software calibrated the 90[degrees] pulse of 4.
The low field NMR measurements, that is, the measured hydrogen spin-lattice relaxation times, showed that PMMA and PVDF form partially miscible blends.
These distribution fittings corroborate the interpretation of spin-lattice relaxation times.
The low-field NMR measurements through the hydrogen spin-lattice relaxation time showed that the addition of different contents of PMMA into PVDF produces blends with partial miscibility.
slow] are the exponential proton spin-lattice relaxation rate constants for the rapidly and slowly relaxing components, respectively.
i] is the proton spin-lattice relaxation rate constant for component i and t is the recovery delay.
Table 2 summarises the results from spin-lattice relaxation time [T.
Walters, Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in the presence of magnetic-field gradients, Phys.
Proton laboratory-frame spin-lattice relaxation times ([T.
As shown by Schantz (2), carbon spin-lattice relaxations for PMMA at room temperature are not sensitive to changes in segmental motion in blends with PEO.