spiculation


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spiculation

(spĭk′yə-lā′shən)
n.
Formation into a spicule or spicules.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the degree of border irregularity, lobulation, and spiculation observed on noncontrast CT scans (slice thickness: 1.25 mm), lesions were visually scored from levels 1 to 5 as follows: level 1, lesions with regular borders; levels 2, 3, 4, and 5, lesions with slight, intermediate, slightly high, and high levels of lobulation and spiculation, respectively.
They reported that the "computer-extracted speculation measure was shown to yield higher classification accuracy than the spiculation rating of an experienced radiologist".
In malignant lesions, the spiculations associated with invasive lung cancers (Figure 6) were also more readily apparent on micro-CT images compared with conventional CT.
However, in some cases the classic diagnostic appearance of a hemangioma of the nasal bone has been found to actually represent spiculation and "soap bubble osteoporosis."
The authors found that 3 clinical variables (age, smoking history, and cancer history) plus 3 radiographic variables (diameter, spiculation, and nodule location in the upper lobes) were independent predictors of malignancy.
Data collected in the field were days to heading (number of days after 31 May when 80% of spikes were fully emerged from the boot), plant height (distance from soil surface to the tip of spikes, excluding awns), spike type (vrs1vrs1Int-cInt-c = normal six-rowed, Vrs1Vrs1int-cint-c = normal two-rowed, and Vrs1Vrs1Int-cInt-c = hybrid two-rowed), presence of lemma awn spiculation (smooth, semi smooth, and rough), spike angle (1 = erect spike, 90[degrees] from horizontal; 5 = bent spike, 0[degrees] from horizontal), and spike density (number of rachis nodes per cm of rachis).
Four lesion properties -- calcification, spiculation, roughness and shape -- were used to distinguish benign and malignant characteristics.
Computed tomography (CT) revealed a large (16.5cm X 10cm) lobulated mass lesion seen in the right hemithorax showing smooth margin with no evidence of calcification or spiculation. The lesion is seen abutting the right cardiac border with mild contralateral shift of the mediastinum.
They often show spiculation or finger-like projections invading the surrounding tissues.
Diagnosis often requires biopsy or resection, which may yield a solitary mass with an irregular margin and spiculation. The mass tends to be flat or ovoid (rather than rounded) and may contain air bronchograms or may cavitate.