sphincter

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sphincter

 [sfingk´ter]
a circular muscle that constricts a passage or closes a natural orifice. When relaxed, a sphincter allows materials to pass through the opening. When contracted, it closes the opening. Four main sphincter muscles along the alimentary canal aid in digestion: the cardiac sphincter, the pyloric sphincter, and two anal sphincters. Other sphincters are found in the iris of the eye, the bile duct (sphincter of Oddi), the urinary tract, and elsewhere.
anal sphincter (sphincter a´ni) either of two sphincters (the internal and external anal sphincters) that open and close to control evacuation of feces from the anus.
cardiac sphincter a sphincter between the esophagus and the stomach, opening at the approach of food that can then be swept into the stomach by rhythmic peristaltic waves.
sphincter of Oddi a sheath of muscle fibers investing the associated bile and pancreatic passages as they traverse the wall of the duodenum.
pyloric sphincter a sphincter at the opening from the stomach into the duodenum; it is usually closed, opening only for a moment when a peristaltic wave passes over it.
urinary sphincter, artificial a fluid-filled system that surrounds the urethra with a silicone cuff that functions as a sphincter; a pump is in the scrotum and a fluid reservoir is in the abdomen. For urination, the pump's release valve is squeezed to allow the fluid to leave the urethral cuff and return to the reservoir; after urination is complete, the pump is squeezed and the fluid returns to the cuff to occlude the urethra.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sphinc·ter

(sfingk'tĕr), [TA]
A muscle that encircles a duct, tube, or orifice in such a way that its contraction constricts the lumen or orifice.
Synonym(s): musculus sphincter [TA], sphincter muscle [TA]
[G. sphinktēr, a band or lace]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sphincter

(sfĭngk′tər)
n.
A ringlike muscle that normally maintains constriction of a body passage or orifice and that relaxes as required by normal physiological functioning.

sphinc′ter·al adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

sphinc·ter

(sfingk'tĕr) [TA]
A muscle that encircles a duct, tube, or orifice in such a way that its contraction constricts the lumen or orifice; it is the closing component of a pylorus (the outer component is the musculus dilatator).
Synonym(s): sphincter muscle.
[G. sphinktēr, a band or lace]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sphincter

A muscle ring, or local thickening of the muscle coat, surrounding a tubular passage or opening in the body. When a sphincter contracts it narrows or closes off the passageway.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

sphincter

a ring of muscle surrounding a tube or the opening to a tube that controls the size of the aperture it surrounds and, thus, the movement through the tube;examples are pyloric and anal sphincters.Sphincter muscles are unusual in that they are normally contracted and only occasionally relax.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Sphincter

A circular band of muscle that surrounds and encloses an opening to the body or to one of its hollow organs. Damage to the sphincter surrounding the anus can cause fecal incontinence.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

sphinc·ter

(sfingk'tĕr) [TA]
Muscle that encircles a duct, tube, or orifice in such a way that its contraction constricts the lumen or orifice.
[G. sphinktēr, a band or lace]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
It uses this lateral pharyngeal sphincteric motion, along with the motion of the levator veli palatini muscle, to create a functional, dynamic obstruction to air flow.
According to Perello (1978), the vestibular folds represent the medial sphincter protecting the larynx, its lower part being formed by the vocal folds and the upper part by the epiglottis.This way, they perform the primary function of the larynx from the phylogenetic point of view: the sphincteric action of preventing the entrance of strange bodies into the respiratory tract.
Initially, research into the pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis was related to ductular and sphincteric abnormalities.
This 1-month program primarily targeted increasing laryngeal sphincteric activity.
Levator ani and coccygeus, considered to be the primary supporting and sphincteric muscles of the pelvic floor, are the focus of most anatomical descriptions included in clinical texts concerned with assessment and treatment techniques.
Associated pathology includes sphincteric abnormalities, secondary fistulas, urethral defects, and ureteral fistulas or obstructions.
If, for example, she has a mixed mechanism involving a hypermobile urethra and intrinsic sphincteric deficiency, a transvaginal tape (TVT) procedure is really the way to go.
Intrinsic sphincteric deficiency is the number one reason for failed Burch procedures in these patients.
Two major components contribute to the etiology of SUT: urethral hypermobility or intrinsic sphincteric deficiency (ISD).
Secondary to sphincteric injury." The physician's examination showed no evidence of injury to the sphincter.
Urethral sphincteric evaluation (e.g., pressure transmission ratio, leak point pressure) when appropriate (C).