peat moss

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sphag·num moss

a highly absorbent moss used as a substitute for absorbent cotton or gauze in surgical dressing and sanitary napkins.
Synonym(s): muskeag moss, peat moss

peat moss

1. Any moss of the large genus Sphagnum whose decomposed and compacted remains form peat. The moss is absorptive and acidic and inhibits growth of bacteria and fungi. Synonym: sphagnum moss
2. The decomposed and compacted remains of the mosses, used as a soil conditioner and as a dressing for wounds. It has also been used by some primitive people as a form of external menstrual protection. Synonym: sphagnum moss
See also: moss
References in periodicals archive ?
Sphagnum often occurs along chemical and physical gradients (Andrus 1986), and local adaptation is one proposed mechanism explaining differential success along the gradients.
The chronology of the peat profile was established by [.sup.14]C AMS dating (12 samples of Sphagnum stems), spheroidal carbonaceous particles, radionuclide dating using naturally occurring [.sup.210]Pb and tephrochronology.
Sphagnum itself is a marvel of carbon-based life and is among the first and simplest plants to evolve on terrestrial Earth.
Although Oberdorfer (1960) only discussed "Myrteolo-Sphagnetea" in his syntaxonomical checklist, there appears to be no doubt after the author's explanations that the name used to describe Sphagnum should be S.
The substrates were moistened, keeping the ratio of 1:6 (w:w) for the sphagnum and 1:2.5 (w:w) for coconut fiber, or in the case of sphagnum 600 mL of water were used to moisten the 100 g of substrate and for the coconut fiber per 100 g of substrate 250 mL of water were used.
Pulverize the dried sphagnum moss and have it sterilized.
Sphagnum moss has been used as a dressing for wounds for more than 1000 years, including at the Battle of Flodden in 1513, because it is extremely absorbent.
From the Estonian bryoflora 11 species and the genus Sphagnum belong to the Annexes II and V of the EU Habitats Directive (Habitat Directive, 1992), four of these and 36 Sphagnum species are recorded in the present list of mire species.
Swinehart conducted the first systematic, quantitative study of Tamarack Bog, as well as Hickory Bog (a tiny Sphagnum bog nestled within the crest of an esker).
The sphagnum mosses (Sphagnopsida) are an early divergent and distinct group.
In this study we investigated the leaching of selected elements belonging to Group 1 (Cs and Li) and from Group 2 (Be, Sr, and Ba) from the soil control and plant growth substrate composed of coal fly ashes from two sources, and ashes mixed with soil and with the soil and sphagnum peat moss (SPM).