spermicides


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

spermicides

Contraceptive preparations designed to kill SPERMATOZOA. In general, spermicides used alone are unreliable as contraceptives.
References in periodicals archive ?
Spermicides may cause irritation to the woman or her partner, especially if used several times a day.
Some women and men experience allergic reactions to certain spermicides or to rubber or latex used in condoms, diaphragms or cervical caps.
Hence the objective of this study was to isolate the protein from these extracts and to study its effects on sperm in vitro in comparison with nonoxynol-9, a known spermicide.
The Food and Drug Administration is requiring manufacturers to include a warning label on all over-the-counter, stand-alone vaginal contraceptive and spermicide products containing nonoxynol 9, saying that the chemical does not protect against HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases.
If possible, avoid contraceptives containing the spermicide nonoxynol-9.
7) In March 2003, WHO also published interim recommendations on the use of N-9 spermicides in an on-line update to its medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use (see http://www.
Food and Drug Administration has approved a number of birth control methods, ranging from over-the-counter male and female condoms and vaginal spermicides to doctor-prescribed birth control pills, diaphragms, intrauterine devices (IUDs), injected hormones, and hormonal implants.
In addition, spermicides containing other active ingredients, such as octoxynol-9, benzalkonium chloride and menfegol, are also distributed in developed and developing countries.
NEW YORK -- In a new report the World Health Organization (WHO) concludes that non-oxynol-9 (N-9), which is used in all spermicides in the United States, is moderately effective at preventing pregnancy when used alone and also improves the contraceptive effectiveness of diaphragms and cervical caps.
Health care providers should continue to discourage the use of the spermicide nonoxynol-9 as a contraceptive, as recommended previously Condoms lubricated with spermicides are no more effective than other lubricated condoms in protecting against STDs.
The 2002 STD treatment guidelines state that condoms lubricated with spermicides are no more effective than other lubricated condoms in protecting against the transmission of HIV infection and other STDs (7).
There are no federal regulations directly prohibiting ads on TV for condoms, spermicides, or birth control pills.