spermatophore


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sper·ma·to·phore

(sper'mă-tō-fōr),
A capsule containing sperms; found in a number of invertebrates.
[spermato- + G. phoros, bearing]

spermatophore

(spər-măt′ə-fôr′, spûr′mə-tə-)
n.
A capsule or compact mass of spermatozoa that is transferred from the male to the female during mating in many invertebrates and certain salamanders.

sper′ma·toph′o·ral (spûr′mə-tŏf′ər-əl) adj.

spermatophore

a packet of sperm that is transferred from male to female in certain invertebrates such as crustaceans, molluscs and cephalopods, and in a few vertebrates such as aquatic salamanders.
References in periodicals archive ?
Preston-Mafham 2000): when the first spermatophore is ready to transfer, the male turns his back while raising his forewings perpendicularly to the body, which exposes the glandular structures located on the metanotum below the base of the forewings.
Spermatophores and spermantangias were cleared with trypsin and then transferred to glycerol (Vecchione, 1991).
We also judged, based on the frequent mating activities observed, that the 26 d period was sufficient for females to pick up necessary spermatophores for fertilization.
After being discharged from the spermatophore in the spermatophoric reaction, the sperm mass is encased in a thin covering, with the cement body at one end.
Cloacal glands have been implicated in the production of different components of the male spermatophore (Sever and Houck, 1985).
In this species, the fecundity and viability of the eggs from females paired with virgin males, and with males who had several matings in 24 hour intervals was not significantly different, even though the spermatophore transferred in the first copula was significantly larger compared to those later released in additional matings (Knight 2007).
Manual and electrical spermatophore extrusion methods of the pink shrimp Farfantepenaeus paulensis (Decapoda: Penaeidae) wild broodstock
Mate guarding may prevent other males from mating with the female, as these males may dislodge the spermatophore inserted in a previous mating.
One question Zamudio hopes to answer is how female salamanders tell a cousin's spermatophore from the hundreds of others.