sperma


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sperma

(spĕr′mă) [Gr.]
1. Semen.
2. Spermatozoa.
References in periodicals archive ?
This theory argues that he continues to use the terms gone and sperma to refer to the menses, because they carry the mother's individual movements even though they are not fully 'seed' in the sense of male semen.
Regarding the activity and the potency of further development of the seed, he mostly prefers to speak about psuche, while in relation to nutrition, physical power or gender difference, he prefers expressions soma, to apokrithen or sperma.
The crucial moves are these: movements (kineseis) that code for inheritable traits are present in the sperma both actually and potentially, but in the katamenia only potentially.
Name Origin: From the Greek words leptos (slender) and sperma (seed), referring to its narrow seeds.
Corporalita molesta che si ripercuote nell'affiorare degli umori e delle anatomie del concepimento: mestruo, sperma, seni, fianchi dilatati e vagine scrutate con lo specchietto, segni che rimandano a una sterilita da superare.
The freedom-slavery discussion points to Hagar and thus also to sperma Abraam, since the slavery of sperma is the Law (although this is not formally mentioned).
From a study of bird eggs, it is possible to determine that a pregnancy cannot be initiated unless the material provided in the female's egg is first mixed with the male's sperma (728a29-30, 730a14-15, 741a28-31, 757b15-16).
Ma certo, di questo non me inganno, ch' io non vegga in questo effectto le matri, dove vogliano contentar tal loro parto, haver li ventri d' artificial vetro, et le materie in loco di sperma, esser cose composte accidentali, et similmente li calori che adoprano, non sieno discontinui intemperati fuochi, molto dissimili alli naturali, con mancargli certa proportion di sostanza nutritiva, et augmentativa, et cosi anco interviene alli tempi, misure, et pesi, a tali effetti necessari.
In Aristotle's one-seed theory, sperma and catemenia refer to greater or lesser refinements of an ungendered blood .
As evidence that female and male are both principles of generation, Aristotle mentions that they both secrete sperma, generative fluid.