zinc

(redirected from spelter)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

zinc

 [zingk]
a chemical element, atomic number 30, atomic weight 65.37, symbol Zn. (See Appendix 6.) It is a trace element in the diet, a component of several enzymes, including DNA and RNA polymerases and carbonic anhydrase. It is abundant in red meat, shellfish, liver, peas, lentils, beans, and rice. A well-balanced diet assures adequate intake of zinc. Those who may suffer from zinc deficiency include persons on a strictly vegetarian diet and those who are on a high-fiber diet. In the latter case, the zinc is bound to the fiber and is eliminated in the feces without having been absorbed through the intestinal wall. Poor absorption of zinc also can occur in persons with chronic and severe bowel disease. The recommended daily intake is 12–15 mg for an adult. A severe deficiency of zinc can retard growth in children, cause a low sperm count in adult males, and retard wound healing. Signs of a deficiency include anorexia and a diminished sense of taste. An excessive intake of zinc (usually in those who work with the metal or breathe its fumes) can either cause pneumoconiosis or interfere with the body's use of copper and other trace elements, producing diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and other signs of intestinal irritation.
zinc acetate a salt used as an astringent and styptic.
zinc chloride a salt used as a nutritional supplement in total parenteral nutrition and applied topically as an astringent and a desensitizer for dentin.
zinc oxide a topical astringent and skin protectant; also a sunscreen.
zinc stearate a powder of zinc in a compound with stearic and palmitic acids; used as a water-repellent skin protectant in dermatoses.
zinc sulfate a topical astringent for mucous membranes, especially those of the eye.
zinc undecylenate the zinc salt of undecylenic acid; it is a topical antifungal.

zinc (Zn),

(zingk),
A metallic element, atomic no. 30, atomic wt. 65.39; an essential bioelement; a number of salts of zinc are used in medicine; a cofactor in many proteins.
[Ger. Zink]

zinc

(zingk) a chemical element, at. no. 30, symbol Zn; it is an essential micronutrient present in many enzymes, but is toxic on excessive exposure, as by ingestion or inhalation (e.g., metal fume fever ).
zinc acetate  an astringent and styptic.
zinc chloride  a salt used as a nutritional supplement in total parenteral nutrition and applied topically as an astringent and a desensitizer for dentin.
zinc oxide  a topical astringent and protectant; also a sunscreen.
zinc sulfate  a topical astringent for mucous membranes, especially those of the eye.
zinc undecylenate  the zinc salt of undecylenic acid; it is a topical antifungal.

zinc (Zn)

[zingk]
Etymology: Ger, Zink
a bluish-white crystalline metal commonly associated with lead ores. Its atomic number is 30; its atomic mass is 65.38. It is ductile in its pure form and occurs abundantly in minerals such as sphalerite, zincite, and franklinite. It has many commercial uses, such as a protective coating for steel and in printing plates. It is an essential nutrient in the body and is used in numerous pharmaceutics, such as zinc acetate, zinc oxide, zinc permanganate, and zinc stearate. Zinc acetate is used as an emetic, a styptic, and an astringent. Zinc oxide is used internally as an antispasmodic and as a protective agent in ointments. Zinc permanganate is used as an astringent and in the treatment of urethritis by injection or douche in a 1:4000 solution. Zinc stearate is used as a water-repellent protective agent in the treatment of acne, eczema, and other skin diseases.

zinc

A metallic element (atomic number 30; atomic weight 65.39) which is an essential daily requirement. Zinc plays a key role in growth and development, and is required by more than 200 metalloenzymes, including DNA- and RNA-polymerases, carbonic anhydrase, carboxypeptidase, reverse transcriptase, as well as by zinc-finger proteins involved in gene expression. Zinc is stored in synaptic vesicles and is a synaptic neuromodulator, acting in the hippocampus to induce depolarising synaptic potentials. The recomended daily allowance (RDA) of zinc is 5–15 mg/day (normal range 70–120 µg/dL). 

Dietary source
Seafood, red meat  wheat germ, veal sesame seeds, pumpkin and squash seeds, chocolate and peanuts. ± 20% of dietary zinc is absorbed, the process of which is enhanced by protein-rich foods (animal proteins, brewer’s yeast, legumes, nuts, pumpkin seeds, seafood, whole grains); ±90% is excreted in faeces.
 
Toxicology
Zinc-laden fumes and dusts are generated in the manufacture of alloys, paints, synthetic rubbers and roofing materials.

zinc

(zingk)
A metallic element, atomic no. 30, atomic wt. 65.39; an essential bioelement; a number of salts of zinc are used in medicine; a cofactor in many proteins.
[Ger. Zink]

zinc

A metallic element required in small quantities for health. Deficiency is rare but may occur in people with certain MALABSORPTION conditions, with ANOREXIA NERVOSA, DIABETES, severe burns, prolonged feverish illness, severe malnutrition in childhood and in alcoholics. Zinc deficiency is associated with atrophy of the thymus gland and depressed cell-mediated immunity, skin atrophy, poor wound healing, loss of appetite, persistent diarrhoea, apathy and loss of hair. A normal diet contains plenty of zinc but a small zinc supplement is said to shorten the duration of the common cold.

zinc,

n an element/mineral found in meat, nuts, seeds, eggs, whole grains, and brewer's yeast. Has been used to remedy deficiencies (relatively common) and to prevent infections and to treat upper respiratory conditions, oral herpes (topical), acne, anorexia nervosa, macular degeneration, male infertility, and sickle cell anemia. Zinc is toxic when taken long-term in high doses. Caution is advised for patients taking diuretic medications, fluoroquinolones, penicillamine, and tetracyclines. Caution is advised for children and pregnant or lactating women, for whom the maximum daily intake is 40 mg. Also called
zinc sulfate, zinc gluconate, zinc citrate, zinc picolinate, or
chelated zinc.

zinc

(zingk)
A metallic element and essential bioelement; many salts are used in medicine; a cofactor in many proteins.
[Ger. Zink]

zinc

a chemical element, atomic number 30, atomic weight 65.37, symbol Zn. See Table 6.
Zinc is a trace element that is a component of several enzymes, including DNA and RNA polymerases, and carbonic anhydrase. Zinc salts are used in skin lotions, eye washes, the treatment and prevention of footrot of sheep and facial eczema of sheep and cattle.

zinc acetate
a salt used as an astringent and styptic.
zinc cadmium sulfide
used in the preparation of fluoroscopic screens; is fluorescent and emits yellow-green light when excited by x-rays.
zinc carbonate
a mild astringent; used mainly as calamine.
zinc chromate
an industrial compound used in cold galvanizing of metal. Accidental access causes diarrhea and fatal enteritis.
zinc finger motif
sequence of approximately 30 amino acids, forming a helix-turn-helix, believed to form a structure that includes tetrahedrally coordinated zinc (II) ions. Found in many eukaryotic, prokaryotic and viral DNA-binding proteins.
zinc finger protein
DNA-binding proteins that contain zinc-finger motifs.
zinc gelatin
a mixture of zinc oxide, gelatin, glycerin and purified water; used topically as a protectant.
zinc gluconate
a source of supplementary zinc.
hereditary zinc deficiency
lethal trait A46; see inherited parakeratosis.
zinc nutritional deficiency
causes parakeratosis in pigs, a chronic, afebrile, noninflammatory disease of the epidermis characterized by crusty proliferation and cracking of the skin. Dogs fed diets with high levels of calcium or cereals may have poor absorption of zinc and develop signs of deficiency, primarily in the skin. See also zinc-responsive dermatosis.
zinc ointment
a preparation of zinc oxide and mineral oil in white ointment; used topically as an astringent and protectant.
zinc oversupplementation
causes hemolytic anemia, anorexia and vomiting.
zinc oxide
a compound used as a topical astringent and protectant. Inhalation of fumes causes interstitial emphysema and atelectasis.
zinc phosphate
used as a phosphate-bonded cement in restorative dentistry.
zinc phosphide
used at one time as a rodenticide. When ingested the poisonous gas phosphine is liberated and kills the animal without diagnostic signs or lesions.
zinc poisoning
is usually chronic and causes stiffness and lameness with particular involvement of the shoulder joint in which there is a degenerative arthritis. In acute poisoning there is gastroenteritis with vomiting.
zinc-responsive dermatoses
see parakeratosis, zinc-responsive dermatosis.
zinc stearate
a compound of zinc with stearic and palmitic acids; used as a water-repellent protective powder in dermatoses.
zinc sulfate
a compound used as an ophthalmic astringent, in skin lotions (see white lotion), for sheep footrot, and the treatment of facial eczema. It is the common form of zinc for oral supplementation and treatment of zinc-responsive diseases.
zinc sulfate flotation test
used to demonstrate nematode eggs, protozoan cysts, and larvae in feces and bronchial secretions.
zinc sulfate turbidity test
1. serum globulins are precipitated by zinc sulfate. The test is used for the semiquantitative assessment of the immunological status of foals and calves when there is a question of whether they have suckled to receive immunoglubulins.
2. an outdated liver function test.
zinc undecylenate
a compound used topically in 20% ointment as an antifungal agent. See also undecylenic acid.

Patient discussion about zinc

Q. If an alcoholic consumes zinc, will he be safe? Hi! While reading through the medical journal, I came to know that if an alcoholic consumes zinc, will he be safe?

A. Approximately 30%–50% of alcoholics have low zinc status because ethanol consumption decreases intestinal absorption of zinc and increases urinary zinc -

excretion-http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16099027?dopt=Abstract

zinc is a necessary mineral you need for the immune system, brain function and other systems of the body.

Q. If an alcoholic consumes zinc, will he be safe? Hi! While reading through the medical journal, I came to know that if an alcoholic consumes zinc, will he be safe?

A. I am glad that you are regularly updating the medical journals. Consumption of zinc is a safe and effective means of affording protection from alcohol induced tissue injury. Zinc deficiency is an underlying feature of alcohol abuse.

More discussions about zinc
References in periodicals archive ?
All Cables Are Double Extra Improved Plow Steel, Drawn Galvanized, 6 X 37 Iwrc Rrl With New Crosby Open Spelter Sockets Or Equivalent.
7 kn,pin dia 81 mm,4 x 36, right hand regular lay, 1960 n/mm2, fitted with one end crosby open spelter other end free, with class certificate.
But, over time, the industrial complex that emerged within a few square miles on the narrow floor of the valley between Llansamlet in the north and Foxhole in the south came to support the production of copper, gold, iron, lead, silver, steel, tinplate, zinc and various alloys such as brass and spelter.
During this time, route 10 buses will terminate on Ryhope Road, close to Global Fitness; route 11 buses from Grangetown towards Sunderland will start at this bus stop and operate via Ryhope Road, Spelter Works Road, and Old Commercial Road, rejoining normal route at Corporation Road beside the allotments.
crane runner wire 03 nos specifications: 260 mtrs x 30 mm, 4 x 39 fc, rhol200kgf/mm2 galvanized, non rotating steel wire rope one end with crosby open spelter socker, pin 63 mm, pin hole 67 mm,
Although appearing to be made of partially gilded bronze, it is in fact composed of a cheaper alloy, spelter, which has been given just a thin coating of bronze.
The sector is characterized by a proliferation of small-scale operations, with approximately 55 percent establishments employing fewer than 20 employees (US Census Bureau 2007, Hardwood Market Report 2008, Spelter et al.
Along with stripping, sandblasting, MPI evaluation, examination, renovation, reassembling, painting and ratifying all the blocks, Transocean also hired AMS to produce and provide bearings, steel wire rope and extra new blocks which involved a 750kg bearing with a 830 mm diameter for the chief traction winch, Teufel-berger ultra high performance steel wire ropes of several sizes and lengths from 25mm to 34mm, and 11 spelter socketed life boat falls of 26mm.
In 1892 she took over the running of the family business - the Llansamlet Spelter Works, a zinc factory employing 200 men.
Route 10 will terminate on Ryhope Rd, close to Global Fitness; route 11 from Grangetown towards Sunderland will start at this bus stop and operate via Ryhope Road, Spelter Works Road, and Old Commercial Road.
But French spelter clocks with swinging pendulums can be acquired for as little as pounds 200, but avoid those that have the slightest damage as the spelter is nigh on impossible to repair.