spell


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Related to spell: spell checker, Cast a Spell, spell check

spell

(spel),
1. An indefinite period or duration.
2. Colloquially, a state of hypnotic trance.

spell

(spĕl)
n.
1. A short, indefinite period of time.
2. Informal A period of weather of a particular kind: a dry spell.
3.
a. One's turn at work.
b. A period of work; a shift.
4. Australian A period of rest.
5. Informal A period of physical or mental disorder or distress: a dizzy spell.
6. Informal A short distance.
v. spelled, spelling, spells
v.tr.
1. To relieve (someone) from work temporarily by taking a turn.
2. To allow (someone) to rest a while.
v.intr.
1. To take turns working.
2. Australian To rest for a time from an activity.

spell

Medspeak
Any period during which an individual is in a particular state—e.g., spell of hospitalisation (hospital stay is widely preferred in the US), spell (bout or period) of sickness.
 
Medspeak-UK
A popular term for the time frame from when a patient is admitted to hospital until discharge.
 
Paranormal
A trance-like state in which a person allegedly communicates with dead persons or various ethereal spirits, most often in a culture-specific context. It has the potential for being misconstrued as a psychotic episode.

spell

noun A period during which a person is in a particular state–eg, spell of hospitalization–hospital stay is preferred, spell–bout or period of sickness. See Blue spell, Dizzy spell Medtalk A '… sudden onset of a symptom(s) that is recurrent, self-limited, stereotypic…' Types Endocrine–eg, hypoglycemia, thyrotoxicosis, carbohydrate intolerance; cardiovascular–essential HTN, angina, pulmonary edema, psychologic–eg, panic and anxiety disorders; hyperventilation; pharmacologic–eg, MAOI therapy, cheese, illicit drugs; neurologic–seizure disorders, migraine; etc–eg, mastocytosis, carcinoid, P vera, POEM syndrome Clinical Facial flushing attributed to vasodilation, accompanied by one of various spell phenotypes–eg, pheochromocytoma, carcinoid syndrome, or mast cell disease, manifest as diaphoresis, numbness, SOB, headaches, chest tightness, ↑ BP, etc Psychiatry A trance-like state in which a person allegedly communicates with dead persons, or various–non-mineral, non-grain spirits, usually in a culture-specific context, most common among African-Americans and/or those from the southern US; the importance lies in it being confused with a psychotic episode. See Culture-bound syndrome.

Patient discussion about spell

Q. what could cause dizzy spells my daughter is 11 and just incountered a dizzy spell legs felt funny and stomach too.

A. sounds like a blood circulation problem, anemia maybe. when there is a problem with oxygen transportation in the body-
the limbs are usually the first to suffer, numbness and feeling like ants are crawling on them. and also dizziness, the brain needs his oxygen. the doctor will probably check for blood pressure, blood works and all that.

Q. Dizzi spells-Help!!!! I keep getting really dizzy and passing out and seem to have constant headaches. I am also really weak and tired all the time and almost never sleep. My doctor won’t do anything but its really making me feel like crap and it is really stressing me out. I really don’t need any more stress in my life because I can’t cope with it like that. somebody help me please

A. Your doctor is the only one that can give you tests and give you the correct advice and treatment. If your doctor is unable to help, then you should see one of the other doctors at your clinic. Getting some sleep may also help you, but you really should see your doctor.

More discussions about spell
References in classic literature ?
Lo, I command the fell spirit that possesses the holy fountain to now disgorge into the skies all the infernal fires that still remain in him, and straightway dissolve his spell and flee hence to the pit, there to lie bound a thousand years.
Their brother, however, was greatly rejoiced to see them, and told them all that had happened to him; how he had found the Water of Life, and had taken a cup full of it; and how he had set a beautiful princess free from a spell that bound her; and how she had engaged to wait a whole year, and then to marry him, and to give him the kingdom.
Her teacher gives her a new object, for instance, a pencil, first lets her examine it, and get an idea of its use, then teaches her how to spell it by making the signs for the letters with her own fingers: the child grasps her hand, and feels her fingers, as the different letters are formed; she turns her head a little on one side like a person listening closely; her lips are apart; she seems scarcely to breathe; and her countenance, at first anxious, gradually changes to a smile, as she comprehends the lesson.
In this lonely self-communion she seems to reason, reflect, and argue; if she spell a word wrong with the fingers of her right hand, she instantly strikes it with her left, as her teacher does, in sign of disapprobation; if right, then she pats herself upon the head, and looks pleased.
During the year she has attained great dexterity in the use of the manual alphabet of the deaf mutes; and she spells out the words and sentences which she knows, so fast and so deftly, that only those accustomed to this language can follow with the eye the rapid motions of her fingers.
we should be obliged to reply, "Nobody can tell what it spells when you set if off by itself; you can only tell by referring to the context and finding out what it signifies--whether it is a thing to shoot arrows with, or a nod of one's head, or the forward end of a boat.
Meeteetse, WY Ranks #1 on List; Champaign, IL, Skaneateles, NY, and Worcester, MA, among the Hardest Cities to Spell in America
Evidence from recent research also suggests that even though teaching children about morphemes is found to be educationally significant, there is little evidence that spelling programs include morphology as a central aspect of learning to spell (Moats, 2005/2006; Nunes & Bryant, 2006, 2009).
I suppose if I spent six hours a day memorizing how to spell bizarre words, I could do pretty well in bees, tooa[bar] but why would I bother to do so?
8220;We wanted to update the Oxford Dictionaries Spelling Challenge because we have seen how much Oxford Dictionaries Online users enjoy word challenges, word games, and learning how to spell interesting words.
It suggests the UK has produced an "auto-correct generation" that relies on computer spell checks.
Simply put: To use spell-check, one needs to know how to spell, just as one must know how to find the correct spelling in a paper dictionary or thesaurus - an existing writing assessment resource.