speechless

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speechless

(spēch′lĭs)
adj.
1. Lacking the faculty of speech.
2. Temporarily unable to speak, as through astonishment.
3. Refraining from speech; silent.

speech′less·ly adv.
speech′less·ness n.
References in periodicals archive ?
(3) This kind of speechlessness has been addressed with the term "open silence", coined by McGuire 1985, to describe a silence which may be interpreted in different ways, especially in theatrical performance.
You do so when you recall the "Sounds of Silence" conference you attended, and which was devoted to issues of race, gender, and oppression; when you evoke the muteness of Tawana Brawley or the speechlessness of Judge Maxine Thomas; when you find yourself in Dartmouth "manumitted back into silence" (3); when you cite Joy Kogawa stating that, "[there] is a silence that cannot speak, a silence that will not speak," (4) that to attend to a voice is to embrace its absence.
Bell Hooks; Talking Back (1989) defines three modes of resistance adapted by African American women: speechlessness, self-reflexive speech and talking back.
Deen's mother, Elaine, who'd never attended a fan camp before, was dazzled to near speechlessness.
I'm not often reduced to speechlessness but you nearly did it this time.
That speechlessness primarily deprived us of his presence among us as a splendid practitioner of the language arts.
I remember my own speechlessness when a male student asked me after class if I was "a real professor;' because, according to him, I just didn't look like one.
Together, Hyacinth and Philomela illustrate the dilemma of World War I poetry, that speechlessness is not always subject to physical mouthlessness.
By pointing to "silence," which symbolizes the highest wisdom, and which is contrasted with a mere indication (or gesture) of speechlessness, the Vimalakirti Sutra demonstrates an authentic approach to the truth of "emptiness", i.e., the possibility of non-dualistic thinking.
Valery, writing at the end of the 19th century: "We must not forget that a thing of great beauty leaves us mute with admiration." Of course, not all forms of admiration are mute, nor are all moments of speechlessness accessories of aesthetic judgment, or expressions of taste.
Not reduced to speechlessness, the speaker's language is nonetheless "cluttered" with "signs of its undoing," and this flotsam testifies to the ways in which he and the trees, mutually disrupting, are also symbiotically constitutive.
Here we will draw upon the work of Peter Nyers to specifically consider how the figure of the refugee is silenced through a discourse of lack and speechlessness implied in Kant's model.