phone

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phone

(fōn) [Gr. phone, voice]
A single speech sound.

cell phone

, cellular phone
A portable telephone, used, for example, in ambulance-to-hospital communications and in 12-lead electrocardiogram transmission in some emergency medical systems. Although many people speculate that cellular phone use may increase the risk of brain cancers (e.g., gliomas or meningiomas), no correlation between moderate usage and cancer has been definitively identified.
References in periodicals archive ?
The brain's primary auditory cortex is sensitive to how ambiguous a speech sound is at just 50 milliseconds after the sound's onset.
a--oe The brain "re-plays" previous speech sounds while interpreting subsequent ones, suggesting re-evaluation as the rest of the word unfolds
Differences between the production of [s] and [J] in the speech of adults, typically developing children, and children with speech sound disorders: An ultrasound study.
The preferential screening targeted speech sound disorders (SSDs) (articulatory and phonological speech sound disorders), fluency, and voice disorders.
To study the cognitive profile of children with a suggestive communication disorder (LD and speech sound disorder) at the age of 4.5 years.
The study of cross-linguistic acquisition of speech sounds has found that the key for correctly perceiving a nonnative speech sound is the native and nonnative sound category mapping.
"There's a set pattern of how sounds will usually emerge and it's normal for pre-school children to make mistakes with their speech sounds.
Speech sounds are produced by air pressure vibrations, generated by pushing inhaled air from the lungs through the vibrating vocal cords and vocal tract and out from the lips and nose airways.
Hopkins's Poetics of Speech Sound: Sprung Rhythm, Lettering, Inscape.
Davies's voice sounds older than many of the characters in the novel, but he differentiates them so well and makes their speech sound so natural that this is only a small quibble.
A brilliant orator can make a badly-written speech sound good, whereas a really bad speaker will send his audience to sleep, or slinking towards the exit, even if the speech was put together by a literary genius.