spectrograph


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spec·tro·graph

(spek'trō-graf),
An instrument used to display or record spectra, as from electromagnetic or sound waves.

spectrograph

(spĕk′trō-grăf) [″ + Gr. graphein, to write]
An instrument designed to photograph spectra on a sensitive photographical plate.

mass spectrograph

A device that separates ions of different masses by employing a magnetic field to deflect them as they travel along a given path.
References in periodicals archive ?
The CHESS spectrograph provides such detailed and comprehensive observations that it can measure not only what atoms and molecules are present, but how fast they are moving and how turbulent the gas is.
However, ore processing is somewhat easier than running a spectrograph on a recycling line, because mines generally scan for one or two types of metal, not a whole gamut of materials.
The imaging spectrograph scans a moving apple hundreds of times, each time sensing a line across the apple's surface.
Using SpectroScope's RP-1 spectrograph fitted with the new distributed focusing technology, the company says it hopes to identify the automotive black plastics.
In 1937, Maurice Hasler, the founder of ARL, produced the first grating spectrograph for the Geological Survey of California.
Upsilon Andromedae's spectrograph revealed that the star was gyrating wildly in space.
Lee and Smith ventured outside the shuttle late Thursday night and spent 6-1/2 hours with the shimmering Hubble, using top-of-the-line power tools as well as old-fashioned muscle power to replace two 1970s-era spectrographs with modern gear.
Using the Subaru Telescope's new Fiber Multi-Object Spectrograph (FMOS), the team's 3D map includes 1,100 galaxies and shows the large-scale structure of the universe nine billion years ago.
Following discussions during a Pro-Am conference in 2003 the ARAS group identified a need for a high resolution spectrograph suitable for amateur use and the LHIRES III spectrograph, now available commercially, was the result.
Two spacewalking astronauts have tackled one of their toughest repairs to the Hubble Space Telescope - a meticulous fix of a broken camera - and installed a new spectrograph that can divine the properties of distant galaxies.
The new findings, slated for publication in the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics, were obtained using the most successful low-mass-exoplanet hunter in the world, the HARPS spectrograph attached to the 3.
In the absence of gravity and movement, radiation from the iron atom would produce a single spike on the craft's spectrograph, corresponding to an energy of 6.