spectrogram

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spec·tro·gram

(spek'trō-gram),
A graphic representation of a spectrum.
[spectro- + G. gramma, something written]

spectrogram (spekˑ·tr·gram),

n a pictorial representation in the form of a graph or diagram that illustrates the results produced by the spectroscopic analysis of a particular substance.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Spectrogram analysis of wake events recorded by the LOGaLevel instruments was performed in a similar manner as by Didenkulova et al.
On the basis of analysis of the spectrograms the moments of time where there is a movement disorder of the mandible have been identified.
Bursts of sound appear as dark shapes on the waveform (where bigger means louder) and colored marks on the spectrogram (which shows frequency).
Calculations of spectrograms were done in frequency range from 3Hz to 3662Hz with frequency step 3.
Phoneticians working with the classification of differences prior to spectrograms and digital processing did an amazing job identifying articulatory properties that actually correspond to acoustic values.
Figures 1a and 1b present spectrograms documenting the sound and pitch registration (the fundamental frequency [F.
In the 1960s, a scientist from Bell Labs, which had earlier developed the sound spectrograph, claimed that human voices, like fingerprints, are unique and that spectrograms (popularly called "voiceprints") could be used to identify people with great accuracy.
Representative ion-pair mass spectrograms from extracts of human urine containing nicotine, cotinine, trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, anabasine, and nornicotine are shown in Fig.
Spectography analysis is, in essence, a matching of similarities, and a distinguishing of differences, between the spectrograms.
After returning from my field work, I prepared sound spectrograms of the contrasting taps using minimal pairs.
Individual drugs have different spectrograms, but with similarities within specific classes," Nolte said.